Nov 30, 2020  
2013-2014 University Catalog 
    
2013-2014 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    BS 724 - Plant Biochemistry


    This course covers the biosynthetic mechanisms of the plant and biogenesis of alkaloids, steroids, glycosides, volatile oils, tannins, flavonoids, and other plant principles.
    2 class hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: one semester of biochemistry)
    (Not offered every year)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    BS 736 - Advanced Pharmacognosy


    This course builds on information provided in BS 336 - Pharmacognosy. A combination of lecture and “journal club” format will be used, which will relate current literature to the lecture themes. Each student will be responsible for preparing a written and oral mini-review of the literature on a topic related to the current state of knowledge in pharmacognosy.
    3 lecture/1 discussion hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of instructor)
    (Not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BS 750 - Virology


    The focus of this course will be the study of animal viruses with an emphasis on viral genetics. Students will develop an understanding of virion structure, viral taxonomy, mechanisms of viral reproduction and replication, the pathology of selected viral families, and the nature of the viral/host relationship.
    3 class hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: one semester of biochemistry)
    (Not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BS 752 - Advanced Immunology


    The principles of immunology will be presented with emphasis on cellular and molecular interactions. The genetic factors that govern immune mechanisms will be described. Application of immunological principles to tissue implantation, hypersensitivity, tumor development and therapy, AIDS, psycho-neuro influences on the immune system, and aging will be discussed.
    3 class hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: one semester each of microbiology, genetics, and biochemistry)
    (Not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BS 761 - Advanced Cell Biology


    This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of recent advances in cell biology through critical analysis of the current literature. The course will be presented in a lecture/seminar format.
    3 class hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: one semester of cell biology, biochemistry, or genetics)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BS 763 - Cell Biology Methods


    The theory of methodologies and techniques commonly used in modern cell biology and biochemistry laboratory settings. Each student will be required to develop an understanding of the theory and current practice of separations and analysis of biochemical and cellular systems, including cell cultures, SDS-PAGE, affinity chromatography, HPLC analysis, cell manipulation, ELISAs, and fluorescence microscopy. The course is complementary to BS 767 - Cell Biology Methods Laboratory.
    3 class hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: one semester each of cell biology and biochemistry)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BS 764 - Biotechnology


    An in-depth study of the techniques and applications of recombinant DNA technology with emphasis on current literature. Students will learn about techniques of recombinant DNA technology, develop an understanding of biotechnology industry product development, and examine ethical issues concerning biotechnology. 
    3 class hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: one semester each of genetics and biochemistry)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BS 765 - Biotechnology Laboratory


    This laboratory course will provide students with the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in recombinant DNA technology, experimental design principles, and data analysis.
    1 pre-lab/3 to 4 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: BS 764 and permission of instructor; students must earn a grade of “B-” or higher in BS 764 to be eligible to enroll in BS 765)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    BS 767 - Cell Biology Methods Laboratory


    Laboratory practice in methodologies found in a cell biology or biochemistry laboratory environment. Typical projects may include extraction and analysis of proteins, enzyme purification and characterization, flow cytometry, densitometric analysis of gels, ELISA analysis, and fluorescence microscopy of cellular components. The course is designed to be the laboratory portion of BS 763 - Cell Biology Methods.
    1 pre-lab/3 to 4 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: one semester each of cell biology and biochemistry)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    BS 768 - Biochemical Genetics


    Topics of current interest in molecular biology and molecular genetics are explored using the current literature.
    2 class hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: one semester each of genetics and biochemistry, or permission of instructor)
    (Not offered every year)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    BS 785 - Introduction to Research


    This course is designed for students who are beginning the research phase of their thesis project or who are deciding between the thesis and non-thesis options. The course consists of at least two rotations in the laboratories of department faculty.
    6 to 12 conference and lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: permission of instructor and program director)

    Credits: 2 to 4
  
  •  

    BS 786 - Research Ethics


    This course will provide an examination of ethical behavior and practice in research in the biological sciences. The course will follow a case study format, and students will be expected to bring examples of incidents from the recent literature to class for discussion.
    1 class hr

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: graduate student in the cell biology and biotechnology program or cell and molecular biology program or permission of the instructor)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BS 790 - Project in Cell Biology and Biotechnology


    Graduate students may perform a graduate-level project under the direction of a mentor. The project must include a comprehensive literature search, an analysis of data, and a written paper.
    3 to 12 conference and lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: completion of 9 graduate didactic hours and permission of graduate advisor and program director)

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    BS 799 - Master’s Research


    Candidates for the master of science in cell biology and biotechnology (thesis option) are required to complete a research project under the direction of an advisor chosen from within the department.
    3 to 4 lab hrs for each credit

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of research advisor)

    Credits: 1 to 12
  
  •  

    BS 820 - Advanced Ethnobotany


    The study of the interactions of various human cultures with plants in the local environment. Topics on the use of plants in medicinal, ritual, and cultural contexts by various aboriginal cultures will be addressed. Such information can serve as the basis for drug discovery and development from natural resources.
    2 class hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of instructor)
    (Not offered every year)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    BS 826 - Cellular Plant Development


    This course will cover the principles of the development of plants at the molecular and cellular levels. Using current literature, the course will emphasize development in relation to hormone interactions, reproduction, and the plant genome.
    2 class hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: at least one semester each of biochemistry, physiology, and genetics, or permission of instructor)
    (Not offered every year)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    BS 850 - Metabolic Engineering


    This course examines the field of metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Students will gain an understanding of the techniques utilized in this field, including pathway and strain construction, balancing of mass and energy in a microbial system, and metabolic network analysis. An emphasis will be placed on how these techniques have been used to improve production of important compounds such as primary metabolites (e.g., ethanol), antibiotics (e.g., penicillin), and various other enzymes and peptides.
    3 class hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BS 764 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BS 860 - Special Topics in Cell Biology and Biotechnology


    This course is designed to allow in-depth exploration of one of a variety of topics of current interest in the field. The topic and credits will be designated by the instructor. A variety of formats may be used, including lecture, presentations, papers, and discussion.
    2 to 3 class hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of instructor or program director)

    Credits: 2 to 3
  
  •  

    BS 862 - Biological Membranes


    This course is designed to provide an in-depth analysis of the structure, synthesis, and function of cellular membranes with emphasis on the current literature.
    3 class hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: one semester each of cell biology and biochemistry)
    (Not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BS 887 - PhD Colloquium


    This course is focused on those skills required by the PhD scientist and consideration of career options.
    1 to 2 seminar/discussion hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BS 898 or permission of the instructor)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BS 898 - Graduate Seminar


    Current literature topics and research in cell biology and biotechnology will be analyzed in writing and presented orally. Each student will prepare a formal research proposal for presentation to the class.
    1 to 2 seminar hrs

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BS 899 - Doctoral Research


    Candidates for the doctor of philosophy degree are required to fulfill their research requirements under the direction of a graduate faculty member of the department.
    3 to 4 lab hrs for each credit

    Credits: 1 to 12
  
  •  

    BW 700 - Academic Writing at the Graduate Level


    Students will learn to write at a level acceptable for those seeking graduate degrees. Students will focus on writing several brief documents based on a proposal that they will develop into a longer paper related to an area of their discipline or future profession. The course will be a combination of lecture and workshop and will be taught online. All work will proceed through the various stages of the writing process.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 701 - Professional Writing in Science


    BW701 is a foundation course that introduces students to two fundamental issues in writing and science: rhetorical theory and the social context surrounding the scientific enterprise. Students are introduced to different styles and examples of medical writing and the thought processes behind them and learn to craft their own writing appropriately for scientific and healthcare professionals and for general and specific audiences. AMA style is required.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 702 - Stylistics and Editing


    This course focuses on the features of style that make different writing projects unique. The course takes a broad approach to medical narrative, from clinical reports to essays on medical writing. Students will also study modern principles of medical editing, apply them to sample documents and become familiarized with the AMA Manual of Style and theories of grammar in analyzing medical text. Through a variety of critiques, they will gain experience in applied principles of grammar and scientific rhetoric.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BW 701 or permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 703 - Information Strategies for Biomedical Writers


    In this course students learn to identify their information needs and corresponding sources appropriate for a variety of biomedical writing projects. Students will search a variety of databases and other resources pertinent to their needs, evaluate the information they find, and use that information appropriately. Students will become familiar with searching medical, business, and government sources and will develop skills to assess available statistics for applicability to their projects. Students will also learn how to retrieve information as a biomedical writer unaffiliated with a university or other library.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 704 - Regulatory Documentation Processes


    This course is an introduction to the drug development process from the regulatory medical writer’s point of view. Specific topics include the ethics of using human subjects in clinical research, overviews of U.S. and international regulatory agencies, product life cycles, the conduct of clinical trials and reporting clinical trial results, and activities and documentation involved with submissions for marketing approval of treatments. This is a core course for both the MS in biomedical writing and regulatory writing certificate programs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 705 - Biostatistics for Biomedical Writers


    This course is an introduction to two main aspects of the use of statistics in biomedical fields to improve students’ skills in reading, writing, and editing biomedical text: the ways in which statistics support arguments in biomedical fields and statistical terminology and tests

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 706 - Ethical and Legal Issues in Biomedical Communication


    This course examines ethical and legal issues related to publishing biomedical information, including the ethics of authorship, editorship, and peer review; conflicts of interest; codes of ethics; scientific misconduct; and contracts, copyright, trademark, and privacy issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 707 - Regulatory Writing: Medical Device Submissions


    This course examines the process of writing medical device submissions. Topics covered include FDA medical device regulations, the medical device development process, and clinical study documents. Students will practice communicating complex scientific information in various documents, including investigator’s brochures, clinical trial reports, and IDE/PMA/510(k) submission components.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BW 704 or permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 708 - Regulatory Writing: New Drug Applications


    This course concentrates on the development of clear, concise, consistent, and complete New Drug Application (NDA) reports, focusing on the clinical study report (CSR). It covers the interface between clinical documents and draft package inserts; resources for preparing the CSR; and practice writing a synopsis, table explanations, narrative summaries, and labeling.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: BW 703, BW 704, and BW 705, or permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 709 - Promotion of Biomedical Products: Regulatory Considerations


    This course examines ethical and legal issues related to the promotion of FDA-regulated products with a focus on pharmaceuticals. The course emphasizes critical thinking and understanding the nature of the underlying issues, and how to write about the issues, and how to apply regulatory information to the communication.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BW 704 or permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 721 - Regulatory Writing: GxP Documentation


    This course examines the process of writing GxP documents. Topics covered include Good Laboratory Practices (GLPs), Good Clinical Practices (GCPs), and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs). Students will practice communicating complex scientific information in various GxP documents. This course builds upon the foundation from BW704 to focus in depth on the particular issues unique to GxP documentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BW 704 or permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 722 - Regulatory Writing: Biologics


    This course examines the process of writing regulatory documentation for biologics. Topics covered include FDA regulation of biologics, the biological product development process, and clinical study documents. Students will practice communicating complex scientific information in various documents for biologics. This course builds upon the foundation from BW 704 to focus in depth on the particular issues unique to biologics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BW 704 or permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 723 - Regulatory Writing: Dietary Supplements


    This course examines the process of writing regulatory documentation for dietary supplements. Topics covered include regulation of dietary supplements as well as the regulation of food additives. Students will practice communicating complex scientific information in various documents for dietary supplements. This course builds upon the foundation from BW 704 and focuses on the particular issues unique to dietary supplements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BW 704 or permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 724 - Chemistry Manufacturing and Controls: Analytical and Manufacturing Processes in Pharmaceutical Development


    This course is an introduction to documenting Chemistry, Manufacturing, and Controls (CMC) information that forms the quality sections of regulatory documents. These are critical for pharmaceutical manufacturing, testing, regulatory reporting, approval for marketing, and licensing of medicinal products. Course content includes discussion of the regulations that govern the industry and guidance documents that lead product development and reporting practices. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: BW 701 and BW 704, or permission of the program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 731 - Anatomy and Physiology Documentation


    An intensive review of basic anatomy and physiology for biomedical writers with little or no prior education in human biology and medical terminology. Students will become proficient in basic anatomy and physiology and learn how to communicate specifically about each body system to a variety of targets using a variety of delivery techniques.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BW 701 or permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 733 - Health Journalism Documentation


    Through discussion of representative scholarly publications, critiques of these publications and their research design, students will become more adept at tackling various communication problems in both scholarly and workplace writing.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 741 - Introduction to Therapeutic Areas


    This course focuses on 22 important disease states or conditions within 8 therapeutic areas. These disease states were chosen because of their market impact, not necessarily because of their relative clinical importance. The course covers the medical basis of each disease state and the important therapeutic classes of drugs used to treat it. Each disease state will be explored in terms of its qualitative and quantitative descriptors, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical course. The analyses of treatments will follow the “STEPS” approach that considers each agent’s Safety, Tolerability, Efficacy, Pricing, and Simplicity profile. The evidence basis for their efficacy claims are explored in the light of clinical usefulness and comparative effectiveness.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BW 704 or permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 750 - Continuing Medical Education


    Continuing Medical Education (CME) is a highly specialized form of biomedical writing. This course introduces students to the concepts underlying continuing education in general and the process for developing CME courses in particular. It covers both the writing and design of effective CME programs in various media (print and digital) and the myriad approval processes for design and delivery.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BW 701 or permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 760 - Entrepreneurship in Biomedical Communication


    This course explores entrepreneurial activities in biomedical communication. Students will read research literature on the evolution of the workplace and the implications of gender on the roles of consultants. They will construct a mission statement, develop a business plan, and study the legal, financial, and ethical issues of operating their own consultancy in biomedical communication.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 780 - Special Topics in Biomedical Communication


    This course is intended as a forum for studying current or innovative topics in biomedical communication. Its topic will therefore vary from term to term. Students will design and carry out appropriate assignments keyed to the special topic being explored in the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: BW 701 or permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 830 - Independent Study in Biomedical Communication


    This course affords the opportunity to pursue research either in a cognate field or on a topic not fully explored in offerings of regular program electives. Students may choose to work with a member of the graduate faculty from another department at USciences for this study with permission of the program director.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: matriculation in the biomedical writing program, BW 701, BW 702, BW 705, and permission of program director)

    Credits: 1–3
  
  •  

    BW 860 - Research in Biomedical Communication


    This course introduces current research approaches—principally ethnographic and historical—in the field of professional and scientific communication. Students learn qualitative research techniques by analyzing online videos and applying the same techniques in the field.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: matriculation in the biomedical writing program and permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 890 - Graduate Research Project I


    This course requires students to demonstrate knowledge of theory and practice in biomedical communication acquired throughout the program. Students will take this course, followed by BW 891 - Graduate Research Project II, as a research-based, independent study to develop a large project: a course for continuing medical education, a product monograph, a major research paper for publication, a website, or a similar project.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BW 891 - Graduate Research Project II


    This course requires students to demonstrate knowledge of theory and practice in biomedical communication acquired throughout the program. Students will take this course as a continuation of BW 890 - Graduate Research Project I, as a research-based, independent study to develop a large project: a course for continuing medical education, a product monograph, a major research paper for publication, a website, or a similar project.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BW 890 and permission of program director)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CA 301 - Greek and Roman Religions


    Consideration of the major rituals and religions of ancient Greece and Rome and their impact on today’s world.
    3 class hrs

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CA 302 - Greek and Roman Philosophy


    Survey of the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans, and the Stoics and their relationship to later modes of thought.
    3 class hrs

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CA 340 - Special Topics in Classics


    Topics addressed in this course vary.
    3 class hrs

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CB 785 - Introduction to Research


    This course is designed for students who are beginning the research phase of their thesis project. The course consists of at least two rotations in the laboratories of program faculty.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: permission of instructor and program director)

    Credits: 2 to 4
  
  •  

    CB 811 - Cancer


    This course is intended to provide prospective graduate students with a rigorous and comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the genesis and progression of human cancer. This basic cancer course has the overarching goal to expand the biological concepts of pathophysiological pathways of biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and genetics that contribute to cancer pathogenesis.
    The course is offered as individual lectures of 1 to 3 hours each and involves faculty members from both Wistar and USciences.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: BS 761, BS 763, BS 764, and CH 728)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CB 812 - Molecular Mechanisms of Cancer


    The objectives of this course are to provide examples of how a better elucidation of mechanistic cancer pathways leads to a better understanding of individual types of cancers. This course is intended to provide students with a mechanism-driven and broad knowledge base to better incorporate the more translational set of topics covered in CB 813 - Molecular Cancer Therapeutics.
    The course is offered as individual lectures of 1 to 3 hours and will be taught by faculty from The Wistar Institute.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CB 811)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CB 813 - Molecular Cancer Therapeutics


    This course provides the third segment of the advanced curriculum and is intended to provide students with an in-depth and mechanistic understanding of the process of drug discovery thematically linked to current therapeutic approaches for cancer treatment. This course is designed to fill an important gap in traditional cancer biology curricula by merging basic elucidation of cancer pathways with the most up-to-date strategies in cancer therapy and cancer prevention, covering all critical aspects of drug discovery, drug development, and regulatory drug approval.
    The course will involve individual lectures of 1 to 3 hours each taught by Wistar and USciences faculty.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CB 812)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CB 880 - Molecular Screening


    The goal of this course is to provide hands-on planning, conceptualization, and assay development of a molecular screening strategy relevant to cancer biology and cancer therapeutics. The wet lab component of the course is designed to leverage the existing collaboration between Wistar and USciences centered on the Molecular Screening Facility at The Wistar Institute.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CB 813)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    CB 890 - Journal Club


    The journal club will be offered each fall and spring semester. Journal club will be taken for zero credits each semester; journal club will receive two credits in the student’s final semester. A grade of pass/fail will be assigned each semester based on the student’s attendance and active participation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of program director)

    Credits: 0 credits in all semesters except 2 credits in student’s terminal semester
  
  •  

    CB 899 - Doctoral Research


    Students must complete a minimum of at least 20 credits of CB 899 - Doctoral Research. While the stated minimum for research is 20 credits, at least two additional years of research after completion of coursework is expected of the students. Students propose, develop, and perform an independent research project under the guidance of a faculty advisor and Advisory Committee.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: permission of research advisor and program director)

    Credits: 1 to 9
  
  •  

    CH 101 - General Chemistry I


    A general course covering basic chemical principles, including atomic structure, periodicity, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, and states of matter.
    3 lecture/1 recitation hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Pre- or corequisite: MA 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 102 - General Chemistry II


    Continuation of CH 101, covering solutions, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, complex ions, elementary kinetics and thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry.
    3 lecture/1 recitation hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 101 and MA 101; corequisites: CH 104 and MA 102)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 103 - General Chemistry Laboratory I


    A laboratory course designed to illustrate fundamental principles of chemistry and to introduce basic chemical laboratory techniques.
    3 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Pre- or corequisite: CH 101)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 104 - General Chemistry Laboratory II


    Continuation of CH 103, with emphasis on titrations and qualitative analysis of cations and anions.
    3 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 103 or CH 113; pre- or corequisite: CH 102)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 109 - Survey of Chemistry


    A survey of general chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry and their impact on society and the environment.
    4 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Not offered every year)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CH 111 - Principles of Chemistry I


    Rigorous treatment of the principles and theories of chemistry, covering atomic structure, stoichiometry, kinetic theory of gases, acids, bases, chemical equilibrium, thermochemistry, and thermodynamics discussed.
    3 lecture/1 recitation hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Pre- or corequisite: MA 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 112 - Principles of Chemistry II


    Continuation of CH 111, covering periodicity, quantum theory, electronic structure and bonding, molecular orbital theory, intermolecular forces in condensed phases and phase equilibria, oxidation-reduction, and electrochemistry.
    3 lecture/1 recitation hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 111 and MA 101; corequisite: MA 102)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 113 - Principles of Chemistry Laboratory I


    Basic chemical laboratory techniques applied to demonstrate the fundamental principles of chemistry. Provides an introduction to complex manipulation of quantitative laboratory data.
    3 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Pre- or corequisite: CH 111)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 114 - Principles of Chemistry Laboratory II


    Continuation of CH 113, with emphasis on qualitative inorganic analysis.
    3 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 113; pre- or corequisite: CH 112)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 120 - Orientation for the Chemical Sciences


    Introduction to all aspects of the chemical sciences, including biochemistry. Students are presented with an overview of the department, the University, the curricula, active research areas, career opportunities, and scientific ethics, as well as information on how they can maximize their USciences educational experience.
    1 lecture/discussion hr

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 201 - Organic Chemistry I


    Introduction to structure and properties of organic molecules, including electronic structure and bonding, physical properties, isomerism, and stereochemistry.
    3 lecture/1 recitation hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 102 or CH 112)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 202 - Organic Chemistry II


    Continuation of CH 201, focusing on chemistry of organic molecules containing functional groups: alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers, amines, and compounds containing the carbonyl group.
    3 lecture/1 recitation hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 201)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 203 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I


    Basic laboratory techniques for manipulations, characterization, and analysis of organic liquids and solids. Introduction to organic synthesis and to chromatographic and spectroscopic methods.
    3 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 104 or CH 114; pre- or corequisite: CH 201)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 204 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II


    Continuation of CH 203, covering development of synthetic and analytical organic chemical techniques.
    3 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 203 or CH 213; pre- or corequisite: CH 202)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 211 - Principles of Organic Chemistry I


    Comprehensive study of theoretical aspects of organic chemistry, utilizing a mechanistic approach. Nomenclature, chemical reactions, reaction mechanisms, and stereochemistry are emphasized in the study of several common functional groups.
    3 lecture/1 recitation hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 102 or CH 112)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 212 - Principles of Organic Chemistry II


    Continuation of CH 211 with an extension of its mechanistic approach to the chemistry of other functional groups.
    3 lecture/1 recitation hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 211)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 213 - Principles of Organic Chemistry Laboratory I


    Synthesis, characterization, and analysis of organic molecules, with emphasis on modern chromatographic and spectroscopic methods.
    1 pre-lab/3 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 104 or CH 114; pre- or corequisite: CH 211)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 214 - Principles of Organic Chemistry Laboratory II


    Continuation of CH 213 emphasizing the development of synthetic and analytical techniques, including classical qualitative organic analysis. Students perform individualized multistep synthetic procedures.
    1 pre-lab/3 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 213; pre- or corequisite: CH 212)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 300 - Discussions in Chemistry


    Discussion of ethical issues and research opportunities in the chemical sciences as well as career planning.
    1 discussion hr

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: third-year standing as a department major)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 321 - Physical Chemistry I


    Covers fundamental concepts of physical chemistry: aspects of thermodynamics, including the first and second laws; chemical and phase equilibria; ideal and non-ideal solutions; and electrochemistry.
    4 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 212, MA 201, and PY 212)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CH 322 - Physical Chemistry II


    Continuation of CH 321, including quantum chemistry, reaction kinetics, spectroscopy, photochemistry, statistical mechanics, and theories of reaction rates.
    4 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 321)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CH 331 - Basic Inorganic Chemistry


    Introduction to basic inorganic chemistry, including elementary bonding theories, the chemistry of elements other than carbon, coordination chemistry, acid-base chemistry, organometallic chemistry, and solid-state chemistry.
    3 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 102 and CH 104, or CH 112 and CH 114)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 340 - Survey of Biochemistry


    This survey of biochemistry uses a descriptive approach to biological molecules, including both structure and function. Cellular components, biochemical reactions, metabolism, and the workings of the genetic code will all be discussed. Overall, a general understanding of biochemistry and its relationship to the world around us will be provided.
    3 lecture/1 recitation hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: BS 104 or BS 131, and CH 202 or CH 212)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 341 - Molecular Structure in Biochemistry


    This introduction to biochemistry covers protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms, membrane structure and function, and principles of biological regulation.
    3 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 202 or CH 212)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 342 - Nucleic Acid Biochemistry


    Focused on molecular genetics, its topics include structure, replication, transcription, translation, repair, recombination, and processing of nucleic acids; control of gene expression; and modern recombinant methods of DNA splicing, cloning, and sequencing.
    3 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 341 and BS 466)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 343 - Intermediary Metabolic Biochemistry


    Catabolic and anabolic pathways with emphasis on chemical logic, mechanisms, and regulatory control. Also includes carbohydrate, lipid, amino acid, and nucleotide metabolism, and oxidative and photosynthetic phosphorylation.
    3 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 341)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 346 - Biochemistry


    An introduction to biochemistry that includes structure of proteins, nucleic acids, and membranes; enzyme kinetics and mechanisms; membrane transport; central metabolic pathways and their regulation; and basic methods of biochemistry.
    4 lecture/1 recitation hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 202 or CH 212)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    CH 356 - Molecular Biology and Genetics


    Introduction to molecular biology and genetics. The biochemistry of the synthesis of DNA, RNA, and proteins and their regulation will be studied. We will also investigate the importance of genetic information to biochemistry and medicine.
    3 lecture/1 recitation hr

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 346)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 361 - Analytical Chemistry


    Introductory analytical chemistry with emphasis on relevant chemical principles, combining both classical and modern instrumental techniques.
    3 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 102 and CH 104, or CH 112 and CH 114)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 363 - Analytical Chemistry Laboratory


    Applications of various classical and instrumental methods for the analysis of unknown samples.
    3 lab/1 pre-lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Pre- or corequisite: CH361 or CH 366)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 366 - Principles of Analytical Chemistry


    An in-depth treatment of the quantitative aspects of chemistry. Chemical equilibria commonly encountered in analytical chemistry and strategies for solving chemical equilibrium problems are emphasized. Modern techniques in analytical chemistry, such as spectrophotometry and chromatography, are introduced in this course.
    3 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 112 and CH 114)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 376 - Instrumental Analysis


    Theory and applications of instrumental methods of analysis are presented including mass spectrometry and spectrophotometric (UV-visible, IR), NMR, electrometric, polarographic, and chromatographic (GC, HPLC) methods.
    3 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 321, and CH 361 or CH 366, and CH 363)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 377 - Instrumental Analysis Laboratory


    Laboratory experience demonstrating chemical instrumentation described in CH 376.
    4 lab/1 pre-lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Pre- or corequisite: CH 376)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 400 - Chemical Science Internship


    Students will participate in an intern experience in chemistry, biochemistry, or pharmaceutical chemistry. This process will include a structured experience within the student’s chosen area of interest. The project will have predetermined research directives, which will be overseen by a University mentor and an industrial/governmental scientist. This is designed to be a “hands-on” experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: BS 131, CH 212, MA 102, permission of department mentor, and permission of department)

    Credits: 3 to 12
  
  •  

    CH 401 - Seminar in Chemistry I


    Chemical and biochemical topics of current interest presented orally by students and invited guest speakers. Writing, speech, delivery, and use of visual aids are critiqued. All biochemistry, chemistry, and pharmaceutical chemistry majors and other interested persons are invited to attend.
    1 seminar hr

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: senior standing in the department)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 402 - Seminar in Chemistry II


    Continuation of CH 401.
    1 seminar hr

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 401)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 404 - Literature of Chemistry


    The study of the nature and uses of the primary, secondary, and tertiary literature of chemistry and biochemistry and of modern information-retrieval techniques.
    1 discussion hr

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 212)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    CH 411 - Medicinal Chemistry


    A study of the biochemical mechanisms of drug action in order to develop a rational approach to the analysis of drugs and their metabolites and to design new drugs.
    3 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 202 and CH 204, or CH 212 and CH 214, and CH 341)
    (Not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 414 - Structure-Activity Relationships (SAR)


    Selected classes of medicinal agents are examined, stressing general structures, synthesis, and, in particular, the relationships between structure and pharmacological activity.
    3 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 212)
    (Not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 416 - Chemical Synthesis Laboratory


    Techniques of organic and inorganic synthesis, including reaction control, vacuum and fractional distillation, uniform reagent addition, controlled stirring, operation in inert atmosphere, safe handling of toxic or unstable reagents, and chromatographic purification.
    1 lecture/6 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 212, CH 214, CH 376, and CH 377)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 423 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory I


    Laboratory investigations emphasizing physical chemical techniques in thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry, quantum chemistry, and physical biochemistry.
    1 pre-lab/4 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 321 and CH 363)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    CH 424 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory II


    Continuation of CH 423.
    1 pre-lab/4 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 423)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    CH 431 - Inorganic Chemistry


    The study of physical inorganic chemistry and chemical bonding, including ligand and crystal field theory, molecular orbital theory, and chemical applications of symmetry. Includes coordination chemistry, acid-base relationships, and application of modern spectroscopic techniques to inorganic compounds.
    3 lecture hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 322 and CH 331)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CH 444 - Biochemistry Laboratory I


    Techniques of isolation, purification, and assay of representative biomolecules, particularly proteins.
    4 lab hrs

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Pre- or corequisite: CH 341)

    Credits: 1
 

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