Nov 24, 2020  
2019-2020 University Catalog 
    
2019-2020 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    IF 702 - Health Information Systems


    This course provides an overview of the computer science and information systems that structure health information technology (HIT). Its detailed exploration of health information systems emphasizes electronic health records (EHRs), sources and utilization of data, the transformation of data and information into knowledge and wisdom, and relevant entities shaping data usage and exchange.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: IF 701)

    (Special registration restriction: Bachelors degree) 

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    IF 703 - Data Management Utilization


    This course covers the core concepts of data management, quality assurance, and healthcare data utilization in depth, emphasizing effective ways of leveraging Big Data to improve healthcare and optimize business gains. Other key components include database management, major programming languages and coding standards, machine learning/artificial intelligence (AI), data mining, predictive analytics, and decision-support systems (DSSs).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: IF 702)

    (Special registration restriction: Bachelors degree) 

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    IF 704 - Strategic Planning in Health Information Technology


    This course reinforces key informatics concepts in relation to relevant management, leadership, and strategic planning mechanisms. In-depth coverage of the SDLC and health information processes includes needs assessment, RFI/RFP formulation, implementation, and evaluation of projects. The course will also cover change management theories and techniques, project management, expectation management, resource allocation, and leadership tools.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: IF 703)

    (Special registration restriction: Bachelors degree) 

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    IS 105 - Introduction to Online Information


    An introduction to finding and evaluating information available in electronic formats. The skillful use of search engines and databases, the construction of effective searches, and the critical evaluation of search results will be emphasized. Elective course for any interested student.
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    IS 205 - Scientific Information


    This course explores the literature of science with particular attention to the literature of the life sciences. Students will learn the types of scientific literature, how to identify the information needed for a particular purpose, and how to find the needed information. The course includes citation managers, non-bibliographic databases, and ethical issues.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BS 119 or BS 133, CH 102, CH 112, PY 202, or PY 212)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    LA 101 - Elementary Latin I


    Elementary basic knowledge of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary and the study of simple literary texts.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    LA 102 - Elementary Latin II


    Development of the knowledge of Latin morphology and syntax. Reading from classical texts.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: LA 101, one year of high school Latin, or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 098 - Preparatory Algebra


    Basic algebra with emphasis on those topics that are important as background for precalculus, chemistry, or physics. This course is for entering freshmen with a weakness in algebra.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: offered during the summer only)

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    MA 100 - Algebra


    Simplifying polynomials, exponents, factoring, rational expressions, complex fractions, linear equations, linear literal equations, non-linear equations, systems of linear and non-linear equations, inequalities, equations of lines, introduction to functions, domain of basic functions and applications. This course does not satisfy the general education mathematics discipline requirement and credits may not be used for graduation.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 104 - College Algebra


    Introduction to functions and graphs, linear functions and equations, quadratic functions and equations, nonlinear functions and equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, modeling data and solving multidisciplinary application problems.  This course is designed for students not required to take calculus or physics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 100 or placement)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 107 - Precalculus


    Introduction to functions and graphs, polynomial functions, rational and radical functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, right triangle trigonometry, and trigonometric functions.  Functions are used for modeling data and solving multidisciplinary application problems.  This course is for students required to take calculus or physics.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 108 - Trigonometry


    Topics include Angle Measurements; Triangles; Trigonometric and Inverse Trigonometric Functions and Graphs; Solving Trigonometric Equations; Essential Trigonometric Identities; Laws of Sine, Cosine, and Tangent; Vectors; Parametric Equations; Polar Coordinates. This course will emphasize application and modeling problems related to the topics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA104 or MA107 or placement)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 110 - General Calculus


    Topics include limits, continuity, rates of change, derivative and techniques of differentiation, analysis of functions using derivatives, relative and absolute extrema, concavity, optimization, implicit differentiation, related rates, and definite and indefinite integral, area, and integration techniques.  Calculus techniques are used for modeling data and solving multidisciplinary application problems.  This course is recommended for students who will not take MA 221, Calculus II.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA107 or placement)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 122 - Calculus I


    Covers limits, continuity, rates of change, derivative and techniques of differentiation, analysis of functions using derivatives, relative and absolute extrema, concavity, optimizing functions, implicit differentiation, related rates, linear approximations, definite and indefinite integrals, integration techniques, and areas. Calculus techniques are used for modeling data and solving multidisciplinary application problems. Appropriate technology is used extensively throughout the course. 
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 107 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    MA 201 - Mathematical Analysis III


    Review of definite and indefinite integrals, areas between curves, volumes, average value of a function, integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, approximate integration, arc length, area of a surface of revolution, differential equations and applications, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. Appropriate technology is used extensively throughout the course.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 102 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    MA 202 - Mathematical Analysis IV


    Study of vectors, lines and planes, three-dimensional surfaces and curves, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, tangent planes, maximum and minimum values, Lagrange multipliers, double integrals, triple integrals, spherical and cylindrical coordinates, vector fields, line integrals, parametric surfaces, sequences, series, convergence tests, power series, and Taylor series. Appropriate technology is used extensively throughout the course.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 201)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    MA 221 - Calculus II


    Review of definite and indefinite integrals, areas between curves, volumes, average value of a function, integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, approximate integration, arc length, area of a surface of revolution, differential equations and applications, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. Appropriate technology is used extensively throughout the course.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 102 or MA 122 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    MA 222 - Calculus III


    Study of vectors, lines and planes, three-dimensional surfaces and curves, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, tangent planes, maximum and minimum values, Lagrange multipliers, double integrals, triple integrals, spherical and cylindrical coordinates, vector fields, line integrals, parametric surfaces, sequences, series, convergence tests, power series, and Taylor series. Appropriate technology is used extensively throughout the course.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 221 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    MA 310 - Mathematical Foundations of Neuroscience


    Topics include Differential Equations, Introduction to Dynamical Systems, the Hodgkin-Huxley Equations, and Mathematical Modeling with an emphasis on Neuroscience. Mathematical software will be used throughout the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 221)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 314 - Discrete Mathematics


    This course provides the mathematical background suitable for a better understanding of, or further study in, mathematics and computer science. Topics will include prepositional logic, set theory, relations, functions, proof by induction, combinations, graph theory, and Boolean algebra.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 110, MA 122 or MA 102)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 315 - History of Mathematics


    A study of the development of mathematics and mathematical reasoning over the centuries, with special emphasis given to the contributions of many cultures and special focus given to the antecedents and future directions of modern mathematical topics and methods.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 110, MA 122 or MA 102)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 316 - Linear Algebra


    Study of systems of linear equations, matrices, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants, inner products, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, similarity, diagonalization, and quadratic forms.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 110, MA 122 or MA 102)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 320 - Differential Equations


    Course covers ordinary differential equations: first order equations, techniques of finding analytic and numerical solutions, higher order differential equations with constant coefficients, solving equations using Laplace transform, analyzing solutions of systems of equations, and multidisciplinary applications. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 221 or MA 201)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 321 - Fourier Analysis


    Study of mathematical theory of Fourier series and the Fourier transform. Includes solutions to partial differential equations using separation of variables and Fourier series. Also covers applications of the Fourier transform.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 320)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 330 - Geometry


    A course in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries with emphasis on foundations, theories, proof, interconnections, and contemporary applications.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 222 or MA 202)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 340 - Introduction to Graph Theory


    This course is designed as an introduction to graph theory. Topics that will be covered include applications of graphs and digraphs, Eulerian graphs and digraphs, Hamiltonian graphs and digraphs, path algorithms, trees, planarity, coloring graphs, and maps.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 221 or MA 201 or permission of department)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 350 - Chaos and Complexity


    An in-depth study of chaos from a mathematical and physical point of view. Special emphasis on the role of geometry, dynamical systems, cellular automata, evolutionary algorithms, and fractals in the mathematical science of chaos.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: MA 221 or MA 201, and PY 202 or PY 212)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 355 - Mathematical Methods for the Physical Sciences (cross-listed as PY 355)


    An introduction to mathematical methods used in physics and the physical sciences such as vector calculus, Fourier analysis, vector spaces and matrices, special functions, and partial differential equations. These topics are introduced in the context of specific problems in various areas of physics and physical science such as fluid dynamics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, biophysics, and mechanics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 212 and MA 222 or MA 202)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 360 - Topics in Mathematics with Applications to Chemistry


    The following topics are covered: 1. Fourier transform, complex functions, and Fourier series with emphasis on applications to nuclear magnetic resonance and signal processing. 2. Groups, groups of symmetries, classes of groups, and subgroups, with emphasis on applications to chemistry. 3. Basics of programming and its application to recursive formulas in chemistry. Appropriate technology is used extensively throughout the course.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 221 or MA 201)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 370 - Mathematical Methods for the Physical Sciences I (cross-listed as PY 370)


    This course, the first of the two-course sequence, is an introduction to mathematical methods used in physics, chemistry, and physical and related sciences: vector calculus, functions of complex variable, Fourier series, Fourier transform, series solutions of ordinary differential equations, and introduction to group theory.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 222 and PY 212, or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 371 - Mathematical Methods for the Physical Sciences II (cross-listed as PY 371)


    This course, the second of the two-course sequence, is an introduction to further mathematical methods used in physics, chemistry, and physical and related sciences: special functions and partial differential equations. These topics are introduced in the context of specific problems in various areas of physics and physical science such as fluid dynamics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, biophysics, and mechanics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 320 and PY 370/MA 370, or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 410 - Numerical Analysis


    Covers methods of root finding, solving linear and nonlinear systems, interpolation, data fitting and approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, and numerical solution to differential equations.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 320 or permission of instructor)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 415 - Abstract Algebra


    Provides an introduction to the theories, proofs, and methods of abstract algebra.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 110, MA 122 or MA 102)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 422 - Mathematical Modeling


    An introduction to the basic formulation of mathematical models with an emphasis on the health and natural sciences. Topics will include discrete and continuous models, dimensional analysis, steady states, and stability.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 221 or MA 201)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 425 - Chaos and Nonlinear Dynamics (cross-listed as PY 425)


    This course introduces the theoretical foundations of nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Phase space analysis, bifurcations, routes to chaos, renormalization and universality, fractals and strange attractors are presented for a variety of nonlinear systems including maps and flows. Several examples are used to illustrate the theory, from mechanical vibrations, superconducting circuits, chemical oscillations to biological rhythms and neuroscience. Simulations are used throughout the course either by numerical computations with Matlab, Mathematica, or specific software packages. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 310 or MA 320)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 430 - Differential Geometry


    The course introduces the main ideas and techniques of differential geometry, a mathematical discipline that studies geometry using methods of multivariable calculus. Topics include the theory of curves (arc length, velocity and acceleration vectors, curvature and torsion, moving frame) and the theory of surfaces (tangent plane, curvature, Theorema Egregium, fundamental forms, flux, geodesics, curvature tensor, manifolds).
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 222 or MA 202)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 490 - Special Topics or Research in Mathematics


    Study of one or two topics in mathematics not included in other courses offered by the department. These topics would ordinarily be designed to follow one-semester courses in at least one of the following: advanced calculus, differential equations, or linear algebra. The course may be taken more than once for credit, provided the topics covered are sufficiently different or if the course represents a research project.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of the department)

    (Course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 1 to 3

  
  •  

    MA 725 - Advanced Nonlinear Dynamics (cross-listed PY 725)


    The course covers advanced topics in chaos and nonlinear dynamics including center manifolds, homoclinic and heteroclinic tangles and chaotic transport, topology of chaos-branched manifolds, invariant sets, and universality. Also, the symmetry of chaos, chaos in Hamiltonian and conservative systems, KAM theorem, stochastic layers and diffusion, and chaos in quantum systems. Theory will be applied to various systems in physics, chemistry, biology, and other fields. Numerical and computational techniques will be presented and used in the applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY425 or MA425)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MD 210 - Belief and Thought


    Traces the various “world views” that have dominated Western thought since the Renaissance. These outlooks resulted from revolutions in the spheres of religion, ethics, science, philosophy, art, music, and the social order. 
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MD 211 - Infinity


    Consists of an in-depth study of how cultural and personal beliefs about infinity influenced the development of quantitative reasoning and science over the centuries. The course will focus on the antecedents of modern beliefs about infinity and on differing cultural notions of infinity.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MD 212 - Nature


    Introduces students to divergent perspectives of nature over time and across cultures. The material is presented in four units, examining varying cultural attitudes and conceptualizations of nature as a creative, preservative, and destructive force and will include an examination of political, social, and economic factors affecting nature during our own time.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MD 213 - Power, Democracy, and Oppression


    Introduces students to the history of political power structures, focusing on the fundamental concepts of power, democracy, and oppression. The course is structured around nine themes (such as absolutism, totalitarianism, and democracy) related to modern political institutions.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MD 214 - Time


    Introduces students to the complex, enigmatic, and often elusive nature of time. The approach taken will be multidisciplinary, historical, and multicultural, covering diverse fields such as physics, medicine, psychology, sociology, religion, art, and philosophy.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MD 215 - Self and Other


    How do we recognize difference in our selves and in others? How is our understanding of the world influenced by stereotypes, curiosity, or fear? From maps and photography to bedtime stories, this class will explore the motivations and methods for knowing our selves and how we relate to others. We will experiment with ideas of empowerment and exploitation from the perspective of minority and majority communities. Themes that we will cover will include language, technology, disability, archives and museums, gender, visual arts and aesthetics, religion, and popular culture. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MD 216 - Introduction to Animal Studies


    This course provides an overview of Animal Studies, a new interdisciplinary field that explores the relationships between human and non-human animals. From a humanities perspective, the historical and current use of animals by humans as companions, food, labor aids, entertainment, and as artistic as well as scientific test subjects are examined for their ethical, political, social, and cultural implications; from a scientific perspective, biology, zoology, psychology, medicine, and climate studies, to name just a few, provide the requisite scientific premises underpinning the field. Students will learn, discuss, and write about a variety of topics such as animal testing, animal farming, keeping pets, animal rights, and the use of animals in entertainment. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MD 218 - What is Piracy?


    What is Piracy? explores the socioeconomic, political and geographical conditions and themes that emerge when comparing different pirate cultures and their oppositions across history. When those conditions and themes are applied to modern global issues (copyright infringement, depleting natural resources, blackmarket trade, etc.), who exactly are pirates today and should they be stopped? 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 102)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MD 220 - Darwin’s Legacy


    This course examines the ways in which Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution is expressed in popular culture. Particular attention will be paid to the nature/nurture debate prior to the nineteenth century, the rise and influence of social Darwinism, scientific racism, eugenics, and the transhuman movement. Forms of discourse studied will include scientific literature, philosophical texts, film, and popular culture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 102 or permission of the Director of Writing Programs)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MD 221 - Medicine and Culture


    This course covers major concepts, theories, events, developments, and figures in medicine. Students will gain enhanced appreciation for the rich history of the profession, knowledge of famous individuals and important medical theories and trends, a deeper understanding of major developments in basic science and patient care, and an augmented perspective on how medicine might change throughout their careers. The course is organized thematically (history of anatomy, physiology, etc.) rather than chronologically, which will allow a sharper focus on issues of interest to students.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 102 or permission of the Director of Writing Programs)
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MD 240 - Special Topics in Multidisciplinary Inquiry


    Gives students the opportunity to explore special topics in multidisciplinary inquiry. The topics will vary according to the professor’s specialty and interests.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    MD 250 - The Master Builders


    The Master Builders is a Multidisciplinary course that explores how writing, literature, and our built environment reflects a culture’s history, values, and vision. How can literature and environmental studies help us gain insight into a society’s built spaces or architectural texts? And finally, how can these multidisciplinary explorations allow us to appreciate (or challenge) the power of great (or dangerous) ideas? 

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

     

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    MI 101 - Misher Studies Orientation


    Introduction to the University’s majors and other programs and to the University resources available to students. Students also will learn study and other personal skills needed for academic success.
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    MI 110 - Introduction to Health and Medical Professions


    Students will learn about professional careers in health and medicine and the process for becoming a health or medical professional. Students will develop plans for meeting professional school requirements.
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    MI 190 - Pre-Pharmacy Orientation


    Students will: learn about campus services supporting academic success and develop their own plans for academic success; apply principles and practices of cooperative teamwork; begin to adopt exemplary personal and professional ethical standards; develop interpersonal communication and presentation skills; and begin to be self-directed learners. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: Open only to students in the Pre-Pharmacy Early Assurance program) 

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    MT 102 - Medical Technology Orientation II


    Detailed description of med tech responsibilities and on-site lab visits. Discussion of current topics in science and healthcare.
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    MT 201 - Medical Technology Seminar


    Emphasis is on reading and discussion of current journal articles in medical laboratory science and student preparation of a research paper. Review of application for internship positions, including résumé preparation and interviewing skills.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: MT 101 and MT 102, or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    MT 218 - Hematology (cross-listed as BS 218)


    Study of the blood and blood-forming tissues with emphasis on the cellular morphology and hematopoietic mechanisms of the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Also covers a wide variety of clinical disorders, particularly those involving abnormally formed cellular elements and coagulation.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BS 104 or BS 131)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MT 348 - Clinical Microbiology (cross-listed as BS 348)


    A survey of the various bacteria that cause human infections. The type of infection caused, portal of entry, molecular basis of the infection process, treatment, and laboratory identification are discussed for each group of organisms.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: BS 243 and BS 244)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    MT 399 - Independent Study in Medical Technology


    Examines clinical laboratory science topics of special interest not included in structured courses. Current issues, trends, or research in such clinical areas as hematology, microbiology, biochemistry, immunohematology, or immunology-serology may be explored by qualified students. A course may be elected more than once.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: permission of instructor and program director)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    MT 490 - Clinical Hematology/Coagulation


    Covers composition and function of blood, diseases related to blood disorders, and the role of platelets and coagulation. Includes manual and automated techniques of diagnostic tests for abnormalities.
     

    Credits: 6 to 8
  
  •  

    MT 491 - Clinical Immunohematology


    Blood antigens, antibodies, crossmatching, hemolytic diseases, and related diagnostic tests and component preparation are covered. Includes in-depth study of blood donor service and its many facets, such as transfusions and medico-legal aspects.
     

    Credits: 4 to 5
  
  •  

    MT 492 - Clinical Chemistry


    Examines enzymology; endocrinology; biochemistry of lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins; metabolism of nitrogenous end products; physiology and metabolism of fluids and electrolytes; and toxicology as related to the body and diseases. Technical procedures covered include colorimetry, spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, chromatography, automation, and quality control.
     

    Credits: 8 to 11
  
  •  

    MT 493 - Clinical Microbiology


    Teaches the identification and clinical pathology of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. Techniques to isolate, stain, culture, and determine antimicrobial susceptibility and instrumentation and quality control are covered.
     

    Credits: 8 to 10
  
  •  

    MT 494 - Clinical Immunology/Serology


    Immune response, immunoglobulins, autoimmunity, and complement, as well as related tests and diseases, are covered. Includes survey and demonstration of serological diagnostic tests.
     

    Credits: 3 to 4
  
  •  

    MT 495 - Clinical Seminar


    Includes courses in orientation, clinical microscopy, laboratory management, venipuncture, lab math, and clinical correlation conferences.
     

    Credits: 3 to 5
  
  •  

    NS 101 - Neuroscience Orientation


    Introduction to the neuroscience program, including current developments and future prospects. Designed to prepare students for current studies and future careers. Required for all first-year neuroscience students; open to all interested students. 

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    NS 260 - Introduction to Neuroscience (cross-listed as BS 260 and PS 260)


    Introduction to neuron structure and function, synaptic transmission, organization of the nervous system, brain-behavior relationships, and current neuroscience methods. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: BS 109 and BS 110 or BS 132 and BS 134 or BS 136)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NS 261 - Introduction to Neuroscience II (cross-listed as PS 261)


    This course focuses on the biological foundations of behavior and cognition. Fundamental methods and processes of the behavioral neuroscience will be emphasized including motivation, emotion, language, attention, memory, and mental illness. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BS 260 or PS 260 or NS 260)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NS 263 - Neuroscience Colloquium


    This course will introduce students to Neuroscience faculty, research, and career options. Students will read primary literature in the field, attend related seminars, and submit reflections or reports based on these activities. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: NS 260 or BS 260 or PS 260; corequisite: NS 261)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    NS 415 - Biophysics of the Brain (cross-listed as PY 415)


    This course introduces biophysical models of the brain and the nervous system functioning. In particular the physics of the neocortex is presented through the analysis of EEG studies. Simulations with software packages are employed to illustrate with various examples the models and their results. Linear electrical analogs and some basics of neural network theory are part of the course content. Elements of Biophysics of consciousness are also presented and a set of case studies is analyzed and discussed. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 202 or PY 212)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NS 422 - Neurodevelopment Disorders (cross-listed as PS 422)


    An introduction of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, with an emphasis on autism spectrum disorder and attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. This course aims to expose students to clinical and scientific thinking about atypical child development. This course will include material on clinical diagnosis and treatment, as well as brain-behavior relationships. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PS 101; any additional 3 credits of PS or NS)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NS 424 - Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience (cross-listed as PS 424)


    This course examines the relations between neural and cognitive development from birth through adolescence. Topics will include: principles of brain development, developmental elasticity, neurocognitive development in various domains (e.g., attention, memory, language), neurodevelopmental disorders, and implications for education. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: NS 261 or PS 261; PS 200 or PS 329)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NS 428 - Neuropsychology (cross-listed as BS 428 and PS 428)


    This course is designed to introduce upper-level students interested in careers in medicine, clinical psychology, and related health science disciplines to the structure-function relationships of the human brain. The course emphasizes adult brain anatomy and function. The behavioral effects of brain damage (e.g., agnosia, neglect, aphasia, apraxia, amnesia) will be related to neuropsychological theories of brain function and examined in depth through readings, case material, and presentations. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PS 101 and BS 119 and BS 120 or BS 133 and BS 135 or BS 137)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NS 460 - Neurobiology (cross-listed as BS 460)


    In-depth study of the molecular and cellular components of neurons and neural networks.  Neuronal functions including synaptic transmission, neurotransmitter release, signaling pathways, and gene expression will be covered.  Primary literature will be used to analyze the cellular mechanisms and components regulating neural systems including sensation, integration, sleep, learning, and memory.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BS 260, NS 260 or PS 260)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    NS 495 - Seminar in Neuroscience (cross-listed as BS 495 and PS 495)


    This course focuses on current research and techniques in the field of Neuroscience through primary literature review, discussion, and analysis. Topics will be chosen based on current discoveries and advancements in the field. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BS 260 or NS 260 or PS 260)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    OT 105 - Overview of Occupational Therapy Practice


    Overview of occupational therapy practice includes practice arenas, roles of therapists, populations treated, values of practitioners, relations with other professionals and nonprofessionals, introduction to the history of the profession, and theoretical concepts.
     

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    OT 112 - Overview of OT Practice I


    Overview of the value of occupational therapy in society. An examination of professional terminology, historical and contemporary concepts of occupation, and the use of activities as a therapeutic and healing experience.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: HS 111 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    OT 115 - Overview of OT Practice II


    An overview of the importance of activity, contextual influences, and social participation in the lives of individuals and communities, and the diversity of occupational therapy practices. Basic professional development concepts and skills are introduced.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: OT 112 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    OT 303 - Human Development and Performance


    Teaches the foundational knowledge of theories of human development and the developmental changes that occur throughout the life span. This course is designed to provide an overview of typical physical, cognitive, emotional, and sociocultural aspects of human development. Emphasis on motor control and motor learning. Introduction to the analysis of developmental changes during human occupational performance of play, work, and self-care activities.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: course in developmental psychology and OT 310)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    OT 320 - Introduction to Clinical Skills


    Introduction to clinical skills, professional behavior, and performance requirements for work in a variety of clinical settings. Students will be required to master emergency procedures, clinical safety, basic strategies to ambulate and transfer chronically impaired individuals, assessment of vital sign response, and assistance of patients with activities of daily living skill development. Student will also learn basic skills of observation, interviewing, goniometry, and manual muscle testing.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: OT 112 and OT 115 or OT 105)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    OT 335 - Clinical Medicine


    Survey of clinical conditions and disease processes that affect functional performance in individuals from birth through old age.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: OT 310)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    OT 352 - Human Occupation: Concepts and Practices


    This course will explore the meaning and purpose of human occupation. The course will examine and analyze activities, habits, roles, and occupations for individuals with varying abilities. Laboratory will emphasize individual engagement in occupations within various social and cultural contexts.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: OT362, OT 303, and OT 308)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    OT 355 - Evaluation and Assessment in Occupational Therapy


    Course covers the selection and use of appropriate standardized and nonstandardized assessment tools for the comprehensive evaluation of patients/clients. Data will be used to establish goals, write reports, communicate findings, supervise staff, and refine interdisciplinary collaboration and home follow-up. Includes an examination of validity and reliability of assessment tools.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: OT 362, OT 303, and OT 320)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    OT 360 - Clinical Application of Teaching and Learning


    The theories and practice of effective clinical teaching are critical in the development of therapeutic interventions for client and community care. Emphasis will focus on the learning theories, clinical reasoning, and the teaching and learning process. This includes individual, family, and community therapeutic education, strategies and grading of activity modalities, and the supervisory process.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: OT 362 and OT 303; corequisites: OT 382 and OT 352)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    OT 362 - Theories of Occupational Therapy


    Study of the theoretical humanistic foundations of occupational therapy practice. Focus will be on major theoretical perspectives, models for practice, and frames of references as a base for practice. Beginning links between theory, practice, and research will be made.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: OT 112 and OT 115 or OT 105, OT 310)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    OT 381 - Fieldwork Level Ia: Application of Clinical Skills


    Students engage in a variety of experiences in order to develop and refine clinical skills and professional behaviors. Students have the opportunity to practice a variety of skills with volunteer clients under the supervision of faculty.
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    OT 399 - Independent Study


    A student-focused project requiring research, design, and implementation under faculty guidance and supervision.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    OT 405 - Overview of Occupational Therapy Practice


    Overview of occupational therapy practice includes practice arenas, roles of therapists, populations treated, values of practitioners, relations with other professionals and nonprofessionals, introduction to the history of the profession, and theoretical concepts.
     

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    OT 422 - Occupational Therapy Interventions I: Contextual Approaches


    The influence of the environment on occupational performance will be explored from a variety of perspectives. Contextual interventions, including environmental modifications and adaptive equipment, will be examined with consideration of meaning and purpose of occupation to individuals with occupational performance limitations. Anthropological interviewing and analysis will be explored as strategies for examining environmental influences in a culturally sensitive manner. This course reinforces general education skill areas of reasoning and problem solving and written communication. This course reinforces the general education value and attitude of cultural differences.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: OT 352 and OT 360; corequisite: OT 480)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    OT 432 - Occupational Therapy Interventions II: Developmental Issues


    Covers the use of evaluation data to design and implement interventions to promote development through the life span. This process will include goal setting, treatment planning, the use of a variety of intervention techniques to allow the client to engage in meaningful occupations, discharge planning, and termination of treatment. Interventions that will be considered include those that promote health, wellness, and occupational performance across the life span.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: OT 355 and OT 422)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    OT 436 - Leadership, Management, and Supervision


    Students will review principles of administration, management, and leadership for clinical program design, funding, implementation, and outcomes. Students will develop an understanding of staffing patterns, quality assurance, reimbursement, contractual issues, program development, and reimbursement issues as they relate to healthcare management; analyze the impact of legislative and social issues on clinical practice, systems of care, and delivery of services; and understand healthcare system cultures as they relate to the occupational therapist, professional, and client perspectives.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: OT 382)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    OT 442 - Occupational Therapy Interventions III: Psychosocial Issues


    Covers the use of evaluation data to design and implement interventions regarding psychosocial components of practice. This process will include goal setting, treatment planning, the use of a variety of intervention techniques to allow the client to engage in meaningful occupations, discharge planning, and termination of treatment. Psychosocial issues across practice domains and through the life span will be explored.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: OT 355 and OT 422)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    OT 487 - Occupational Therapy: Past, Present, and Future


    This course will analyze the profession of occupational therapy from historical and current clinical, social, political, and cultural perspectives.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: OT 352 and OT 362)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    OT 488 - Therapeutic Groups


    This course offers didactic and experiential components designed to prepare students for care delivery in therapeutic groups in all areas of occupational therapy practice. Students will learn to integrate knowledge of group process, group dynamics, and implementation of occupation-based approaches to therapy through lectures and laboratories that allow them to use clinical reasoning and creative critical thinking throughout the semester. This course reinforces the general education skill area of oral communication and the general education values/attitudes area of leadership/teamwork.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: OT 362)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    OT 499 - Independent Study


    A student-focused project requiring research, design, and implementation under faculty guidance and supervision.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    OT 500 - Level I Experiences Seminar


    This course is the introduction to fieldwork for the students in the OT program. Students will be introduced to this topic through the study of professional behaviors and review of skills necessary to be successful in both level I and level II fieldworks. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: OT 115 or OT 105/OT 405)

    (Special registration restriction: Open only to Occupational Therapy students)

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    OT 503 - Human Development and Performance


    Teaches the foundational knowledge of theories of human development and the developmental changes that occur throughout the life span. This course is designed to provide an overview of typical physical, cognitive, emotional, and sociocultural aspects of human development. Emphasis on motor control and motor learning. Introduction to the analysis of developmental changes during human occupational performance of play, work, and self-care activities.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: course in developmental psychology and OT 510)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    OT 508 - Movement Analysis


    Covers osteology, surface anatomy, and kinesiology with emphasis on peripheral and cranial nerves, upper extremities, head, and neck. Regional approach will emphasize movement, performance, observation, and analysis. Lab will feature tutorial groups focusing on clinical problems and application of movement principles, kinesiology, and anatomy. Techniques for evaluating movement will be learned as a method of analysis.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: two semesters of anatomy and physiology)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    OT 508 - Movement Analysis


    Covers osteology, surface anatomy, and kinesiology with emphasis on peripheral and cranial nerves, upper extremities, head, and neck. Regional approach will emphasize movement, performance, observation, and analysis. Lab will feature tutorial groups focusing on clinical problems and application of movement principles, kinesiology, and anatomy. Techniques for evaluating movement will be learned as a method of analysis.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: OT 310)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    OT 510 - Neuroscience


    An introduction to the function and components of the major structures of the normal and abnormal nervous systems including the study of the neurobiological substrates for behavior, learning, and human activity. Laboratory includes an examination of brain specimens.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: successful completion of two semesters of anatomy and physiology)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    OT 510 - Neuroscience


    An introduction to the function and components of the major structures of the normal and abnormal nervous systems including the study of the neurobiological substrates for behavior, learning, and human activity. Laboratory includes an examination of brain specimens.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BS 206)

    Credits: 4
 

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