May 25, 2022  
2020-2021 University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    PH 813 - Design of Experiments


    The student is provided a review of concepts in basic statistics and then a development of those concepts into approaches to the statistical design of experiments that allow screening of factors and eventual optimization of conditions. Emphasis is placed on applications to preformulation studies and formulation of drug products.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: pharmaceutics graduate student or permission of the instructor)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PH 852 - Unit Operations


    Unit operations required in pharmaceutical manufacturing and processing are presented from an engineering point of view.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of instructor)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PH 875 - Drug Dynamics


    Focuses on determination of pharmacokinetic parameters using compartment models; other topics include statistical moments, protein binding, clearance volume of distribution, nonlinear pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. Experimental data will be used to correlate practical applications with theory.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PH 317 or permission of instructor)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PH 880 - Pharmaceutical Polymers


    Covers the physical properties and characterization methods for polymeric materials, specifically as they apply to the design of pharmaceutical dosage forms and drug delivery systems.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: CH 321 or permission of instructor)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PH 890 - Pharmaceutics Seminar


    Presentation of recent research by current graduate students and invited guests will be followed by group discussion.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 0 to 1
  
  •  

    PH 894 - Current Topics in Pharmaceutics


    Topics selected by faculty. Previous topics include formulation development and experimental design.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of instructor)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    PH 895 - Analysis of Current Literature in Pharmaceutics


    Analysis and discussion of current literature in areas of interest in pharmaceutics. Papers are presented informally by students and faculty.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of instructor)

    Credits: 0 to 2
  
  •  

    PH 897 - Research in Pharmaceutics


    The student completes two seven-week rotations through the laboratories of graduate faculty in pharmaceutics, providing experience in basic and applied techniques utilized in conducting research.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of instructor)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    PH 899 - Doctoral Research


    Students in the doctor of philosophy degree program specializing in pharmaceutics are required to fulfill their research requirement under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty in pharmaceutics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of advisor)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 1 to 9

  
  •  

    PHA 100 - PA Freshman Seminar


    This course will address PA students’ goals, as well as provide a brief history of the PA profession and the role of PAs today. Hands-on learning of basic PA skills such as taking patient history and vital signs, HIPPA, U.S. healthcare, and cultural awareness is included.
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PHA 203 - Complementary and Alternative Medicine


    This course is designed to introduce students to the various complementary and alternative medicines with the therapies available to patients and their impact on traditional mainstream medicine. (Covers aromatherapy, herbals, homeopathy, chiropractic, and others.)
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHA 206 - PA Shadowing & Physical Exam I


    Students are required to shadow a PA, physician, or NP for a semester. Students keep a journal of their experiences and prepare a case study presentation. Weekly class focuses on physical exam technique and common pathology of the HEENT and skin.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHA 208 - PA Shadowing & Physical Exam II


    Continuation of PHA 206. Shadowing plus physical exam of the cardiorespiratory, GI, musculoskeletal, and neurological systems is learned.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHA 300 - PA Interview Seminar


    This course examines the importance of interviewing. Communication skills, verbal and nonverbal, are addressed. Students will learn and practice the patient interview as well as the professional interview. Medical ethics will also be addressed.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: fall only)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PHA 303 - Introduction to Pharmacology


    PA students will be introduced to the role of drugs and drug classes as they relate to disease, mental health, and body systems.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: spring only)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHA 310 - Medical Terminology I for the PA


    This course must be taken simultaneously with BS310 because it follows the curriculum of BS310 to coordinate anatomy and physiology with medical terminology of each body system.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: fall only)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PHA 311 - Medical Terminology II for the PA


    Continuation of PHA 310.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: spring only)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PHA 399 - Independent Study


    The purpose of the independent study is to gain experience (fieldwork in service learning, skill training, or research) in their field of healthcare under the supervision of a PA faculty member in the physician assistant studies program.

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    PHA 501 - Human Anatomy


    This course focuses on the study of functional and applied human anatomy. Each topic will utilize lecture and lab experiences that include prosected human cadaver specimens. When appropriate, clinical and surgical correlations are made from a diagnostic, as well as an operative, point of view. Instruction is primarily in lecture and laboratory format. Textbooks, atlases, computer software programs, and other visual aids are available for study. Applied learning based on clinically relevant cases will be emphasized.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisites: PHA 502, PHA 503, PHA 504, PHA 505, PHA 506, and PHA 507)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 502 - Human Physiology


    This course will provide students with a detailed overview of the fundamental aspects of human physiology, including the normal function of the human body and its major organ systems. Understanding the normal physiologic processes will serve as a foundation for understanding altered health states and their therapeutic interventions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisites: PHA 501, PHA 503, PHA 504, PHA 505, PHA 506, and PHA 507)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHA 503 - History/Physical I


    This is the first course of two and is designed to provide students with the fundamental grounding and cognitive knowledge to prepare them for their clinical role. The course will provide students with the skills for interviewing patients and communication skills used to conduct age-appropriate and culturally competent histories, as well as to elicit histories from difficult patients. The course will also provide students with the skills to perform a comprehensive physical exam.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisites: PHA 501, PHA 502, PHA 504, PHA 505, PHA 506, and PHA 507)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHA 504 - Pharmacology I


    This is the first of two courses designed to provide a solid foundation in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and the physiology associated with drug action and interaction. Drugs will be discussed by class with attention given to specific drugs, indications, contraindications, dosage, mechanism of action, side effects, similarities, and differences. Emphasis will be placed on the more common drugs in treatment of common diseases, including EENT, dermatologic, infectious, respiratory, cardiovascular, hematologic, and oncologic, and covers antibiotics and antivirals.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisites: PHA 501, PHA 502, PHA 503, PHA 505, PHA 506, and PHA 507)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHA 505 - PA History


    This course will give the new student the history, roots, and models of the physician assistant profession in medicine and look at the expected future role of the PA in medicine both in the United States and globally. Students will then explore the PA–physician relationship and the role of the PA within the medical team today. Professionalism, the Guidelines for Ethical Conduct for the Physician Assistant Profession, and stress management will also be addressed. Students will also be introduced to the state and national professional organizations and the resources they offer and learn about the certification and continuing medical education process.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisites: PHA 501, PHA 502, PHA 503, PHA 504, PHA 506, and PHA 507)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PHA 506 - Genetics for PA’s


    This one-credit online course will provide PA students with a review of the structure and function of the human genome, genes, chromosomes, DNA, inheritance patterns, and genes associated with human disease. Genetics of common complex disorders and pharmacogenetics will also be covered.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisites: PHA 501, PHA 502, PHA 503, PHA 504, PHA 505, and PHA 507)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PHA 507 - Psychosocial Medicine


    This course will examine the factors that influence a patient’s development and will identify factors that aid in integrating psychosocial and behavioral perspectives to the practice of medicine. The physician assistant students will explore these aspects of their own personalities and evaluate how these aspects may affect interaction with their patients. Students will develop sensitivity for working with culturally diverse patient populations and outline healthcare disparities among minority groups. History taking, which is a core clinical skill, will be examined, and students will learn to elicit medical information with sensitivity and accuracy.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisites: PHA 501, PHA 502, PHA 503, PHA 504, PHA 505, and PHA 506)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PHA 521 - Pathophysiology


    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the pathophysiology of the various organ systems of the human body. An understanding of the pathophysiology of disease and disease states is necessary to apply basic science knowledge to a clinical situation. This course will concentrate on the basic pathophysiologic understanding of disease and its clinical manifestations and will not emphasize areas of diagnosis or treatment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 501, PHA 502, PHA 503, PHA 504, PHA 505, PHA 506, and PHA 507; corequisites: PHA 522, PHA 523, PHA 524, PHA 525, and PHA 526)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHA 522 - History/Physical II and Clinical Skills


    This is the second course of two and is designed to move the student from the normal history and physical exam to a problem-focused history and physical exam in concert with abnormal findings found in various organ systems and pathologies. In addition, students will learn advanced skills required in clinical practice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 501, PHA 502, PHA 503, PHA 504, PHA 505, PHA 506, and PHA 507; corequisites: PHA 521, PHA 523, PHA 524, PHA 525, and PHA 526)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHA 523 - Clinical Medicine I


    This course is the first of two designed to educate the student concerning diseases encountered in primary care medicine. The course will cover the etiology, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnostic studies, and pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment/management plans for each disease. The topics covered include infectious, pulmonary, cardiovascular, hematological, reproductive, dermatological, and EENT diseases and disorders. The course will be lecture format, with small group discussion, along with a supervised clinical long-term care experience that links the didactic phase with the clinical phase.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 501, PHA 502, PHA 503, PHA 504, PHA 505, PHA 506, and PHA 507; corequisites: PHA 521, PHA 522, PHA 524, PHA 525, and PHA 526)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 524 - Pharmacology II


    This is the second of two courses designed to provide a solid foundation in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and the physiology associated with drug action and interaction. Drugs will be discussed by class with attention given to specific drugs, indications, contraindications, dosage, mechanism of action, side effects, similarities, and differences. Emphasis will be placed on the more common drugs in treatment of common diseases, including gastrointestinal, genitourinary, endocrine, neurological, musculoskeletal, psychiatric, and behavioral.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 501, PHA 502, PHA 503, PHA 504, PHA 505, PHA 506, and PHA 507; corequisites: PHA 521, PHA 522, PHA 523, PHA 525, and PHA 526)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHA 525 - Diagnostics I


    This course is part one of a two-semester course providing students with insight into the use of laboratory studies that aid clinicians in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of diseases. Laboratory measurements and examinations provide scientific data that are essential in the management of disease. Laboratory information is important in the prevention and screening of medical disorders and can be used to diagnose or confirm a preliminary diagnosis. Students will be instructed in the selection, indication, and interpretation of laboratory tests.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 501, PHA 502, PHA 503, PHA 504, PHA 505, PHA 506, and PHA 507; corequisites: PHA 521, PHA 522, PHA 523, PHA 524, and PHA 526)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PHA 526 - Introduction to Research/Evidence-Based Medicine


    This course is the first of the required physician assistant research sequence. The course provides an introduction to the research process and its relationship to evidence-based practice. Students will obtain a basic understanding of theory-based research, methodological and ethical considerations in the design of research, and ways of evaluating evidence for practice. Learning will occur through lectures, class discussions, readings, and assignments.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 501, PHA 502, PHA 503, PHA 504, PHA 505, PHA 506, and PHA 507; corequisites: PHA 521, PHA 522, PHA 523, PHA 524, and PHA 525)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PHA 541 - Clinical Medicine II


    This course is the second of two designed to educate the student concerning diseases encountered in primary care medicine. The course will cover the etiology, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnostic studies, and pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment/management plans for each disease. The topics covered include gastrointestinal, genitourinary, endocrine, neurological, musculoskeletal, and psychiatric/behavioral diseases and disorders. The course will be lecture format, with small group discussion, along with a supervised clinical long-term care experience that links the didactic phase with the clinical phase.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 521, PHA 522, PHA 523, PHA 524, PHA 525, and PHA 526; corequisites: PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 542 - Diagnostics II


    This course is the second of two designed to provide the student with knowledge of laboratory testing as an adjunct to the proper diagnosis, treatment, and management of disease. Laboratory testing and interpretation are essential in formulating the correct diagnosis in all patients. The course will use slides, specimens, and clinical case studies to encourage critical thinking with corresponding proper decision making. Students will be instructed in the indication, selection, and interpretation of laboratory tests and diagnostic radiology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 521, PHA 522, PHA 523, PHA 524, PHA 525, and PHA 526; corequisites: PHA 541, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PHA 543 - Research Methods, Design & Implementation


    Building on the first research course and using experiences from clinical skills courses, students are required to design and implement a research project. Students will frame a research question, write a research proposal, and prepare to implement a project. This activity will provide students with the ability to translate clinical problems into research protocols by incorporating published research and class learning with clinical cases.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 521, PHA 522, PHA 523, PHA 524, PHA 525, and PHA 526; corequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PHA 544 - Pediatrics


    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of pediatric medicine from neonate through adolescence. Topics include normal growth and development, preventive care, immunizations, and common pediatric illnesses and their diagnosis and management, as well as other disease limited to the pediatric population.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 521, PHA 522, PHA 523, PHA 524, PHA 525, and PHA 526; corequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PHA 545 - Emergency Medicine


    This course focuses on the specialty of emergency medicine, including an understanding of pre-hospital care (EMS), the relationship between the ER and inpatient services, and the ER as a primary care setting. Emphasis is placed on the skills required to work in the ER. Basic Life Support (BLS) and Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) accreditation will be required for successful completion of this course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 521, PHA 522, PHA 523, PHA 524, PHA 525, and PHA 526; corequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PHA 546 - Surgery


    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the surgical specialty. The management of acute surgical problems, critical illness, solid organ malignancies, and elective surgery procedures will be discussed, as well as pre-op and post-op care of surgical patients. Laboratory sessions will teach technical skills such as universal precautions, sterile technique, suturing, and minor surgical procedures.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 521, PHA 522, PHA 523, PHA 524, PHA 525, and PHA 526; corequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PHA 547 - Women’s Health


    This course provides an introduction to women’s health issues across the life span, including diagnosis, management, and treatment of commonly encountered medical issues in both gynecology and reproductive and obstetric health.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 521, PHA 522, PHA 523, PHA 524, PHA 525, and PHA 526; corequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, and PHA 546)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PHA 601 - Professional Practice Issues I


    This is the first of a series of three courses that will address the practical challenges that PA students face as they prepare to enter the working world of the practicing physician assistant. These courses will review and reinforce the Guidelines for Ethical Conduct for the Physician Assistant Profession, PA governance and guidelines for licensure/credentialing, electronic medical records, billing and coding, and prescribing regulations and risk management, as well as provide a self-study in medical Spanish to improve communication skills with the growing Spanish-speaking populations in the U.S. Students will also be introduced to the U.S. healthcare system, health policy, and public health.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PHA 602 - Issues in Geriatrics I


    This is the first of two courses that will provide the student with a broad overview of the principles of geriatric medicine from the perspective of the primary care practitioner. Major geriatric syndromes commonly encountered in clinical practice will be introduced, providing the student with practical knowledge regarding the care of geriatric patients. This course has been designed to promote interprofessional education and practice. PA students will be expected to work with students from other health-related disciplines, including but not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, health and wellness, and pharmacology. Students will accomplish the stated objectives through lecture presentations, discussion posts, and critical thinking/case-based discussions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PHA 603 - Professional Practice Issues II


    This is the second of a series of three courses that will address the practical challenges that PA students face as they prepare to enter the working world of the practicing physician assistant. These courses will review and reinforce the Guidelines for Ethical Conduct for the Physician Assistant Profession, PA governance and guidelines for licensure/credentialing, electronic medical records, billing and coding, and prescribing regulations and risk management, as well as provide a self-study in medical Spanish to improve communication skills with the growing Spanish-speaking populations in the U.S. Students will also be introduced to the U.S. healthcare system, health policy, and public health.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PHA 601)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PHA 604 - Capstone


    This course encompasses three integrative elements. The first element outlines study skills that aid the student in preparing for the Physician Assistant National Certifying Exam (PANCE). The second element consists of a comprehensive written exam, the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), and demonstration of clinical skills to satisfy the ARC-PA standard C3.04. The third integrative element will provide students with the opportunity to share their research projects with colleagues, faculty, and the University at large. Students will be evaluated on the quality of the presentations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 651, PHA 652, PHA 653, PHA 654, PHA 655, PHA 656, PHA 657, PHA 658, PHA 659, PHA 660, and PHA 661)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PHA 605 - Issues in Geriatrics II


    This is the second of two courses that will provide the student with a broad overview of the principles of geriatric medicine from the perspective of the primary care practitioner. Major geriatric syndromes commonly encountered in clinical practice will be introduced, providing the student with practical knowledge regarding the care of geriatric patients. This course has been designed to promote interprofessional education and practice. PA students will be expected to work with students from other health-related disciplines, including but not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, health and wellness, and pharmacology. Students will accomplish the stated objectives through lecture presentations, discussion posts, and critical thinking/case-based discussions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PHA 602)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PHA 606 - Professional Practice Issues III


    This is the third of a series of three courses that will address the practical challenges that PA students face as they prepare to enter the working world of the practicing physician assistant. These courses will review and reinforce the Guidelines for Ethical Conduct for the Physician Assistant Profession, PA governance and guidelines for licensure/credentialing, electronic medical records, billing and coding, and prescribing regulations and risk management, as well as provide a self-study in medical Spanish to improve communication skills with the growing Spanish-speaking populations in the U.S. Students will also be introduced the U.S. healthcare system, health policy, and public health. During this semester students will be instructed in total quality assurance, registering for the PANCE, preparing their curriculum vitae (CV), preparing for the professional interview, and negotiating their employment contract.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PHA 603)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PHA 651 - Primary Care Rotation I


    This course is the first of two required five-week rotations that occur consecutively in which the student is assigned to a primarily outpatient setting. The goal of these rotations is to educate the physician assistant student in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of the patient in the primary care setting. These rotations can occur in both urban and rural settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 652 - Primary Care Rotation II


    This course is the second of two required five-week rotations that occur consecutively in which the student is assigned to a primarily outpatient setting. The goal of these rotations is to educate the physician assistant student in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of the patient in the primary care setting. These rotations can occur in both urban and rural settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 653 - Internal Medicine Clinical Rotation


    This five-week rotation provides the physician assistant student with the practical experience necessary to interpret and integrate information obtained through the comprehensive history and physical examination, to formulate diagnoses, to develop effective treatment plans, and to provide patient management throughout the hospital course. In addition, students will learn the indications, limitations, and methodology of inpatient diagnostic procedures and therapeutic regimens common to internal medicine.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 654 - Pediatrics Clinical Rotation


    This five-week rotation provides the physician assistant student with clinical experience in diagnosis, evaluation, and management of primary care pediatric patients encountered in the ambulatory, as well as inpatient, settings. Emphasis is placed on the recognition of normal as well as abnormal findings, diagnosis and management of common childhood illnesses, assessment of developmental milestones, immunizations, and well-child care from birth through adolescence.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 655 - Women’s Health Rotation


    This five-week rotation provides the physician assistant student with practical clinical experience in evaluation and management of normal and abnormal conditions in women’s health. In addition, students will learn to provide prenatal and postpartum care, family planning, health education, and counseling.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 656 - Behavioral/Mental Health Clinical Rotation


    This five-week rotation provides the physician assistant student with experience in a psychiatric-based facility (inpatient and/or outpatient). The student will also be provided with practical clinical experience in identification, evaluation, management, and referral of patients presenting with common and/or emergent psychiatric conditions. Students learn to recognize and treat acute and chronic health disorders, affective and cognitive disorders, and disorders associated with substance abuse.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 657 - Surgery Clinical Rotation


    This five-week rotation provides the physician assistant student with practical clinical experience in data gathering, evaluation, and management of general surgical problems encountered in the hospital. Students participate in the management of surgical patients during the preoperative phase, assist during surgery, and provide postoperative and primary care management.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 658 - Emergency Medicine Clinical Rotation


    This five-week rotation provides the physician assistant student with practical clinical experience working in an urban and/or rural acute care setting. This enables the student to develop a focused and systematic approach to the diagnosis and treatment of common medical and surgical emergencies. This rotation also teaches the student about the indications, limitations, and methodology of emergency room diagnostic procedures and therapeutic regimens. In addition, this rotation provides students with the opportunity to formulate organized and complete emergency room records, problem lists, and management plans. The student will gain experience in the emergency room fast track and emergency medical services and in treating more critical patients in the main emergency room.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 659 - Geriatric Medicine Clinical Rotation


    This five-week rotation provides the physician assistant student with experience in evaluating and treating common problems and challenges encountered in geriatric medicine in a variety of outpatient and inpatient settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 660 - Elective Clinical Rotation I


    The first of two five-week rotations that provide the physician assistant student with the opportunity to choose inpatient and/or outpatient experiences in areas of the core curriculum or in a specialty that may include, but is not limited to, dermatology, gastroenterology, plastic surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, radiology, ENT, urology, gerontology, pulmonology, ophthalmology, oncology, orthopedics, or infectious diseases.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PHA 661 - Elective Clinical Rotation II


    The second of two five-week rotations that provide the physician assistant student with the opportunity to choose inpatient and/or outpatient experiences in areas of the core curriculum or in a specialty that may include, but is not limited to, dermatology, gastroenterology, plastic surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, radiology, ENT, urology, gerontology, pulmonology, ophthalmology, oncology, orthopedics, or infectious diseases.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PHA 541, PHA 542, PHA 543, PHA 544, PHA 545, PHA 546, and PHA 547)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PL 101 - Philosophy and Values


    Major thinkers and writers of the Western world and the ways they have perceived the problems of human existence are presented. Opportunities for exploring and creating individual value systems in the light of the great ideas and dramatic situations of the past.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PL 313 - Philosophy of Medicine


    This philosophy course puts medical practices, theories, and values in the broader context of human life, necessitating a cultural and historical approach that complements the focus on modern medicine. Particular topics include the nature of illness and the differing ideas and practices of medical care.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PL 323 - Philosophy of Science


    Scientific values, theories, and practices largely determine the ways in which modern human beings live, act, and interact. This course, therefore, introduces the student to philosophy of science and its development alongside modern science, while focusing on questions about the meaning and value of science for human life.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PL 330 - Philosophy of Race, Class, and Gender


    Experience of race, class, and gender are central to modern human life and self-understanding, though they have become important philosophical topics only recently. Philosophers have long been interested in what it means to be a person, but traditionally sought a universal account of the human being. This course, by contrast, examines experiences and conceptualizations of race, class, and gender by interrogating their significance for different people throughout recent history and today.

     

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    PL 340 - Special Topics in Philosophy


    Topics addressed in this course vary.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PL 501 - Ethics and Values


    Covers the nature of ethics and its place in philosophical thought, perennial ethical systems, and ethical and bioethical dilemmas in healthcare. Opportunities given to explore and examine personal values; attempts to define the good life in contemporary society.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PO 101 - Introduction to Political Science and the American Government


    Examination of the national governmental system, the foundation of government in the United States, and separation of powers and relations with states and citizens.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: not offered every semester)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PP 190 - Pharmacy Orientation


    Students will develop plans that will lead to academic success. Students will review on-campus services that support academic success. Students will begin to understand and apply the principles and practices of cooperative teamwork and begin to adopt exemplary personal and professional ethical standards. Students will begin to develop interpersonal communication and presentation skills and begin to be self-directed learners. 
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PP 307 - Physical Assessment Skills for Pharmacists


    Students are introduced to fundamental physical assessment techniques (inspection, percussion, palpation, auscultation) and skills for assessment the skin, eyes, nose, ears, oropharynx, chest, cardiovascular system, peripheral vascular system, abdomen, musculoskeletal system and nervous system. Abnormalities associated with common medical diseases and disorders and adverse drug effects are identified. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Special Registration Restrictions: Open only to P1, P2, and P3 Doctor of Pharmacy Students)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 308 - Physical Assessment Skills for Pharmacists


    Students are introduced to fundamental physical assessment techniques (inspection, percussion, palpation, auscultation) and skills for assessing vital signs, respiratory system, cardiovascular system, nose, eyes, ears, oropharynx, and neurologic system.  Abnormalities associated with common medical diseases and medications are identified. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Special Registration Restrictions: PharmD students) 

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PP 309 - Clinical Reasoning


    Students are introduced to the concept and application of clinical reasoning. Clinical reasoning skills are developed through application of the clinical reasoning process during in-class case-based team activities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisite:  PP306)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 310 - Research Design


    The appropriate design and application of major study types (surveys, interviews, experimental, naturalistic and participant observational, archival, and combined designs) and ethical issues and legal regulations for animal and human research are addressed.  Students learn the knowledge and skills necessary to identify and select a suitable research question and develop an appropriate research protocol including data analysis techniques and budgeting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite:  ST 310)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 321 - Immunotherapies


    The immunotherapies elective course focuses on mechanism of action, indications, drug administration and adverse effects of select new immunotherapies including immune checkpoint inhibitors, adoptive cellular therapy, dendritic cell vaccines and non-cancer therapy monoclonal antibodies. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Special Registration Restrictions: P1, P2, and P3 PharmD students)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PP 322 - Labs and Diagnostic Tests for Pharmacists


    Students learn to assess, interpret and apply common laboratory and diagnostic tests.  Laboratory tests include complete blood count, the basic metabolic panel, arterial blood gas and tests for cardiac and hepatic damage.  Diagnostic tests include the electrocardiogram and chest imaging (chest X-ray, MRI and CT).   

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Special Registration Restrictions: PharmD students)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PP 327 - Global Health Determinants and Application


    This elective course will introduce and discuss important topics in global health, focusing specifically on care of the undeserved in a global context. Topics discussed will include health policy and economics, determinants of health, essential medicines, community-oriented primary care, refugee health, women’s health, and climate change. In addition to readings and weekly discussion groups, students enrolled in this course will have the opportunity to gain valuable practice-based skills by working with partner agencies. These opportunities are designed to focus on current and future contributions of pharmacists to global health and the role of global health in pharmaceuticals and pharmacy practice. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Special Registration Restriction: P1, P2, P3 PharmD students)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 340 - Cultures and Therapeutics


    Students are introduced to the cultural differences between the U.S. healthcare (Western) system and non-Western cultures. The course explores characteristics of non-Western cultures and potential strategies for managing pharmacotherapeutic issues with patients who have healthcare belief systems that differ from the U.S. healthcare cultural system.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: P1, P2, or P3 pharmacy student status)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 359 - Pharmacist’s Introduction to the Pharmaceutical Industry


    This course is designed for Doctor of Pharmacy students an overview of the pharmaceutical industry, with a focus on the career options available to pharmacists. At the end of this course, the student will demonstrate skills that would be used in retrieving & evaluating medical literature to develop medical information documents that are geared for a global audience of healthcare professionals. In addition, the student will learn aspects of adverse event reporting, drug development and approval process, FDA regulations on product labeling and promotional advertising, and sales marketing. 

     


     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: P1 status)

    (Special Registration Restriction: open only to P1 to P3 registered in the pharmacy program)

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    PP 398 - Special Topics in Pharmacy Practice


    This course will address topics in contemporary pharmacy practice that are not covered in other courses. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisite: May include enrollment with instructor permission)

    (Special Registration Restriction: PharmD students in the professional years of P1-P3)

    Credits: 1-3

  
  •  

    PP 399 - Special Topics in Pharmacy


    This course will address topics in contemporary pharmacy practice that are not covered in other courses. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisite: May include enrollment with instructor permission)

    (Special Registration Restrictions: PharmD students in the professional years of P1-P3)

    Credits: 1-3

  
  •  

    PP 422 - Medication Therapy Management Certificate


    This advanced MTM (Medication Therapy Management) certificate course will prepare student pharmacists to improve medication use through the delivery of MTM services in a variety of practice settings. At the conclusion of this course students will have the opportunity to receive the “APhA Delivering Medication Therapy Management Services” certificate.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Special Registration Restrictions: P2 and P3 PharmD students)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PP 450 - Complementary and Alternative Therapies


    A consideration of complementary and alternative approaches to healthcare that involve the use of agents suggested to have therapeutic value. Natural, botanical, and herbal products, dietary supplements, nutraceuticals, and homeopathic products are among the topics included.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: completion of the third year of the curriculum)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 451 - Advanced Asthma Pharmacotherapy


    This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma and evidence-based asthma therapeutics, including the drug-delivery devices, patient assessment skills, and patient education skills.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite or corequisite: P2 or P3 doctor of pharmacy student status)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PP 452 - Anticoagulation Management


    Building upon a cardiovascular physiology foundation, this therapeutics elective will build student knowledge of existing and emerging oral and injectable anticoagulants, anti platelets and thromboembolic diseases. The structure and outcomes of inpatient and outpatient anti coagulation services will be discussed. The student will refine skills in monograph writing and clinical trials interpretation. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PP 465; corequisite: PP 466) 

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 464 - Orientation to Nuclear Pharmacy


    Basic concepts of properties, development, and handling of radioactive materials and their diagnostic and therapeutic uses. Basic radiation physics and use of radiopharmaceutical preparations in diagnosis and treatment of disease states are presented.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PC 301 and PY 202)
    (Note: may not be offered every year)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 483 - Special Topics: Interprofessional Longitudinal Experience to Appreciate Patient Perspectives I


    This is an intraprofessional course developed in collaboration with University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine and School of Nursing. This course will focus on the Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (IPEC) Core Competency Domains: values and ethics, roles and responsibilities, interprofessional communication and team/team work. This course will introduce students to the biopsychosocial model of healthcare, specifically as it relates to patients with chronic illnesses. iLEAPP uses a longitudinal “patient-centered learning” approach to help students focus on disease and illness from the patient’s, not the provider’s, point of view. This course will provide the opportunity to learn about interprofessional teams and teamwork as an integral component of the comprehensive care of patients with chronic disease, basic attributes of a good provider-patient relationship, such as patient-centered communication, trust, good listening skills, empathy, etc., and how providers can strengthen and enrich that relationship and competencies in interprofessional collaboration including roles and responsibilities, values and ethics, teams and teamwork, and interprofessional communication. The learners will participate in an initial plenary session, consistent interprofessional clinical team contact with patient, mid-semester group learning session, written assignments and reflections, shadowing interprofessional healthcare teams at various practice sites and an end-semester clinical team meeting. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PP 306 and PP 317)

    (Note: Three semester sequence. Students must be committed to complete all three semesters.) 

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    PP 484 - Special Topics: Interprofessional Longitudinal Experience to Appreciate Patient Perspective II


    This is an intraprofessional course developed in collaboration with University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine and School of Nursing. This course will focus on the Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (IPEC) Core Competency Domains: values and ethics, roles and responsibilities, interprofessional communication and team/team work. This course will introduce students to the biopsychosocial model of healthcare, specifically as it relates to patients with chronic illnesses. iLEAPP uses a longitudinal “patient-centered learning” approach to help students focus on disease and illness from the patient’s, not the provider’s, point of view. This course will provide the opportunity to learn about interprofessional teams and teamwork as an integral component of the comprehensive care of patients with chronic disease, basic attributes of a good provider-patient relationship, such as patient-centered communication, trust, good listening skills, empathy, etc., and how providers can strengthen and enrich that relationship and competencies in interprofessional collaboration including roles and responsibilities, values and ethics, teams and teamwork, and interprofessional communication. The learners will participate in an initial plenary session, consistent interprofessional clinical team contact with patient, mid-semester group learning session, written assignments and reflections, shadowing interprofessional healthcare teams at various practice sites and an end-semester clinical team meeting. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PP 483)

    (Note: Three semester sequence. Students must be committed to complete all three semesters.)

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    PP 495 - Project in Pharmacy Practice


    Opportunity for qualified students to carry out a project in pharmacy practice application or research under the direction of a pharmacy practice faculty member. Each student is required to prepare a report summarizing his/her objectives, progress, and conclusions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: at least P2 pharmacy status and permission of instructor)

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    PP 496 - IPPE Patient Care Project in Pharmacy Practice


    This IPPE course provides an opportunity for students to work with a faculty mentor(s) in a patient-care practice setting to gain insight and skills in conduct of a scholarly project. The project is to be based on literature interpretation and hypothesis testing, laboratory measures, data analysis, professional practice standards, medication safety, medication-use evaluations, practice demonstration programs, and/or programmatic assessments; as well as project summarization and conclusion generation, with preparation of a poster or professional or committee presentation. The faculty mentor and student should agree upon the specific objectives and expectations for the course at the beginning of the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PP 465, PP 467, PP 469, PA 462, and PC 411)

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    PP 508 - Pharmacotherapeutics in Hospice and Palliative Care


    Hospice is one of the fastest growing areas in healthcare today. Increasingly, healthcare professionals are relying on pharmacists to provide recommendations for the management of complicated symptoms at the end of life. The goal of this course is to prepare the pharmacy student to take an active role in the medical management of chronically and terminally ill patients. Students will gain an appreciation for various ethical, social, and legal issues that can impact healthcare provision at the end of life. Furthermore, students will discover the role of the pharmacist as it relates to the interdisciplinary setting of hospice and palliative care.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisites: PP 565 or PP 566, and PP 567 or PP 568)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 514 - Clinical Treatment Approaches to Psychiatric Illness


    The purpose of the course is to provide an advanced lecture series on the major psychiatric disorders and related special topics with emphasis on psychopharmacologic treatment.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PP 565 and PC 412)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 521 - Advanced Pulmonary Therapeutics


    This course focuses on comprehensive evidence-based therapeutics of pulmonary medical diseases and/or conditions.  Using team-based learning, students will gain knowledge of drug-induced lung disease, obstructive lung disease, interstitial and inflammatory lung disease, alveolar lung disease, disorders of the pulmonary circulation, disorders of the pleural space, lung neoplasms, and lung infections.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PP 466)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 523 - Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Practice


    This advanced ambulatory care pharmacy practice course will prepare students for providing pharmacy services in primary care settings. Students will build knowledge of practice models and complex therapeutic disease states, improve verbal and written communication skills with patients and providers, and gain experience with utilizing an electronic medical record. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PP 565 and PP 567; corequisites: PP 566 and PP 568)

    (Note: Open only to P3 PharmD students)

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    PP 524 - Interprofessional Care of the Geriatric Patient


    Students are introduced to the interprofessional nature of geriatric patient care. Focus is placed on the care of geriatric patients from a variety of different health care perspectives using simulated patient cases to continue development of students’ abilities in therapeutics, problem solving, and communication. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisite: PharmD P3 status)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 525 - Pharmacist-Led Cardiovascular Disease Risk Management Course


    The course will provide an in-depth understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular risk assessment, therapeutic lifestyle changes, and evidence based pharmacotherapy. This course will assist students to further develop their critical thinking, clinical decision-making, and patient/healthcare professional communication skills for managing patients with or at risk for cardiovascular disease. At the conclusion of this course, students will receive the APhA Pharmacy-Based CVD Risk Management Certificate. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PP 466 and PP 565; corequisite: PP 566)

    (Note: Open only to P3 PharmD students)

     

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    PP 529 - Introduction to Pediatric Pharmacy Practice


    This course is designed to develop skills for the management of neonatal and pediatric drug-related challenges. Basic principles governing optimal drug therapy, such as drug delivery, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics, and assessment of neonatal and pediatric patients will be reviewed. Selected pediatric dilemmas will be discussed with emphasis on medication safety and administration, pediatric resources, and dosing. Problem-solving and decision-making skills will be fostered through patient case presentations and discussions utilizing primary and tertiary resources.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PP 465 and PP 466; corequisites: PP 565 and PP 569)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 541 - Pharmacogenomics


    Basic science of pharmacogenomics with an emphasis of the applications of pharmacogenomic principles to improve drug therapy outcomes.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PC 411 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 547 - Critical Care Therapeutics


    The course will offer an introduction to the pharmacotherapeutic management of the critically ill patient. The pathophysiology and drug therapy of selected problems in the critically ill population will be covered. Students in the course will discuss these topics with a number of activities throughout the semester. The course will strengthen the student’s ability to evaluate and apply primary literature as well as verbal presentation skills. Active participation will allow the student to hone his/her clinical skills in real-life situations.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisites: PP 565 and PP 567, or PP 566 and PP 568)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 559 - Problem-Based Approach to Acute Care Medicine


    Students will focus on guidelines and evidence-based medicine to further develop the skills and knowledge base in therapeutics in order to provide optimal drug therapy to internal medicine patients who are hospitalized. Faculty will utilize a problem-based learning format in the course to facilitate critical thinking development and student-centered learning.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PP 460; corequisites: PP 565 or PP 566)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 584 - Special Topics: Interprofessional Longitudinal Experience to Appreciate Patient Perspectives III


    This is an intraprofessional course developed in collaboration with University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine and School of Nursing. This course will focus on the Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (IPEC) Core Competency Domains: values and ethics, roles and responsibilities, interprofessional communication and team/team work. This course will introduce students to the biopsychosocial model of healthcare, specifically as it relates to patients with chronic illnesses. iLEAPP uses a longitudinal “patient-centered learning” approach to help students focus on disease and illness from the patient’s, not the provider’s, point of view. This course will provide the opportunity to learn about interprofessional teams and teamwork as an integral component of the comprehensive care of patients with chronic disease, basic attributes of a good provider-patient relationship, such as patient-centered communication, trust, good listening skills, empathy, etc., and how providers can strengthen and enrich that relationship and competencies in interprofessional collaboration including roles and responsibilities, values and ethics, teams and teamwork, and interprofessional communication. The learners will participate in an initial plenary session, consistent interprofessional clinical team contact with patient, mid-semester group learning session, written assignments and reflections, shadowing interprofessional healthcare teams at various practice sites and an end-semester clinical team meeting. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PP 484)

    (Note: Three semester sequence. Students must be committed to complete all three semesters.) 

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    PP 617 - APPE Preparatory Enrichment


    This course, delivered over two weeks, is intended to optimize student transition from didactic education to their Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE). Content will include orientation to APPEs, guidance on optimizing rotation experiences, and updating relevant pharmacy practice knowledge and skills.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PP 618 - APPE Preparatory Enrichment II


    This course is intended to assess student development and achievements during their APPE rotations and prepare students to successfully transition from their professional education to practice, including pharmacist licensure.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Corequisite: current enrollment in APPE rotations)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PP 631 - APPE Community Pharmacy


    The APPE Community Pharmacy rotation is a 5-week experience where PharmD students are in engaged patient-focused provision of pharmacy services in a community pharmacy. Students will provide patient counseling, OTC triage, medication therapy management, etc., under pharmacist supervision as part of an integrated community pharmacy service model.

    Credits: 5
  
  •  

    PP 632 - APPE Hospital Pharmacy Practice


    The APPE Hospital Pharmacy Practice rotation is a 5-week experience where PharmD students gain experience in how medications are managed in the acute care setting and how hospital-based pharmacists oversee the appropriate and safe use of medications, including oversight of medication ordering, dispensing, and administration; use of technology and informatics; and the development and use of formularies, drug policies, procedures, and protocols.

    Credits: 5
  
  •  

    PP 633 - APPE Ambulatory Care


    The APPE Ambulatory Care rotation is a 5-week experience where PharmD students are engaged in provision of patient care and chronic drug therapy medication management in an outpatient practice setting. This rotation can take place in a pharmacist-managed outpatient practice or in a physician office practice.

    Credits: 5
  
  •  

    PP 634 - APPE Acute Patient Care


    The APPE Acute Patient rotation is a 5-week experience where PharmD students are engaged in provision of patient care and medication management as part of an interprofessional hospital-based medical team under the supervision of a pharmacist preceptor. Examples of patient focus may include general medicine, critical care, oncology, cardiology, or infectious diseases.

    Credits: 5
 

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