May 23, 2022  
2020-2021 University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    CS 498 - Research in Computer Sciences I


    This is the third course in the Systems Simulation sequence. An individual student research project in the area of system dynamics will be developed in the framework of this course. Specific subject domain of the research project (health policy, bioinformatics, biology, environment, sustainable development, etc.) depends on the scientific interests of the supervisor and the student’s background. During the course students will identify and analyze problems from the chosen subject domain, formalize the information flows, and describe the obtained results of the student project.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CS 329 and either CS 330 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 2 to 3
  
  •  

    CS 499 - Research in Computer Sciences II


    This is the fourth course in the Systems Simulation sequence. An individual student research project in the area of system dynamics will be developed in the framework of this course. Specific subject domain of the research project (health policy, bioinformatics, biology, environment, sustainable development, etc.) depends on the scientific interests of the supervisor and the student’s background. During the course students will build a simulation model by using an actual simulation language (software), validate the model, develop (program) a scenario of a computational experiment, run the model, analyze the modeling results, and describe the obtained outcomes of the student project.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CS 329 and either CS 498 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 2 to 3
  
  •  

    DA 301 - Data Science and Analytics Introduction I


    As data becomes increasingly important to the modern world, there is an increasing need for scientists educated in the process of collecting, coding, cleaning, analyzing, and presenting those data. This course will introduce you to the basic concepts of data analysis; the uses of data in a variety of fields; how to ask research questions; the process of identifying data sources; data collection, cleaning, coding, and manipulation; and how to present data. At the conclusion of the course, you will have a firm foundation to begin working with a variety of data in different scenarios.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    DA 302 - Data Science and Analytics Introduction II


    Building from the concepts introduced in Introduction to Data Science I, this course will provide you with the opportunity to develop more advanced programming skills. You will learn the basics of creating visualizations in R, how to perform different data wrangling procedures, and how to work with relational databases and different types of variables. You will also develop skills needed to program, model, and use R to communicate findings from the data you analyze. At the end of the class, you will be prepared to work on projects using the R software and will have a foundation for learning even more advanced programming in R.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    DA 308 - Introduction to Epidemiology


    Epidemiology is the foundational science of public health. Epidemiological research helps us understand how diseases occur in certain groups of people and why, in order to identify the determinants of health at the population level. In this course, you will be introduced to the basics of epidemiology. Topics covered will include measures of disease occurrence; measures of association; study designs; the roles of bias, random error, confounding, and effect modification in epidemiological studies; and screening for disease. At the conclusion of the class, you will be able to read and interpret epidemiological studies and explain how an epidemiological study could be designed to answer a particular health question.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    DA 309 - Essentials of Biostatistics


    Biostatistics is a central field for understanding and analyzing health and clinical data. This course will introduce you to the basics of data analysis for health studies. Specific topics will include probability, error, descriptive statistics, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, power size calculations, and different statistical models. At the conclusion of the course, you will be prepared for learning more advanced biostatistical skills and conducting analyses of health data.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    DA 401 - Introduction to Data Structure/Algorithms


    Algorithms are an essential tool in data analysis. Additionally, for data analysis to be conducted, the data should be structured in an efficient way. This course covers the essential elements of creating algorithms and the methods used to structure data. You will learn about growth functions, divide and conquer strategies, probabilistic analyses, sorting, basic data structures, hash tables, search trees, and dynamic programming. Throughout the course, you will apply topics covered using both real and simulated data.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    DS 101 - Data Science Orientation


    Students are presented with an overview of all aspects of Data Science, including current topics, active research areas, and expectations and career opportunities. Students will learn about campus services, and begin to develop interpersonal communication and presentation skills, and apply principles and practices of cooperative teamwork. 

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    DS 201 - Introduction to Data Science I


    This course will introduce students to data science and equip them with the basic ideas, principles, practices, and challenges of modern data generation, process, and analysis. Students will be introduced to high programming languages and learn to write basic code using, for instance, R, R-Studio, and a variety of add-on packages. Real datasets from a variety of disciplines will be used to make the learning contextual. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    DS 202 - Introduction to Data Science II


    This second course in Data Science deepens students’ knowledge of data curation, management, visualization, and analysis, building from the foundation of DS 201. This course extends data management concepts and skills to accommodate big data and also deepens students’ understanding of computational problems and machine learning. Students will be introduced to additional programming languages, e.g. Python, SQL, HADOOP. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: DS 201) 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    DS 301 - Data Visualization (cross-listed as ST 311)


    This course is designed to equip students with theoretical and practical tools needed to build effective and engaging data visualizations, and demonstrate competence in designing and developing visual stories with data. Students will learn visual representation methods and techniques that improve understanding of complex data and models, with emphasis placed on the identification of patterns, trends and differences from data sets across categories, space and time. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: ST 310 and DS 202) 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    DS 400 - Data Science Internship


    Students in this course participate in an internship in Data Science. This will typically involve a structured series of experiences in the student’s area of interest that provides exposure to work environments where data science concepts are applied. Students work closely with an off-campus supervisor and his/her academic advisor to coordinate the experience. This is designed to be a “hands-on” experience. 

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    DS 401 - Time Series and Forecasting (cross-listed as ST 401)


    The course will provide students with basic understanding of time series data and various components that could be present in data gathered through time. Popular statistical methods and the corresponding theory to model time series data are discussed and practiced on real and simulated data. Model selection and parameter estimation is discussed in conjunction with checking model assumptions. An adequate model is then used to make forecasts. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: ST 331)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    DS 403 - Applied Machine Learning


    The course provides an introduction to machine learning and statistical learning algorithms. Various supervised, unsupervised, and reinforced learning theory and algorithms are introduced and practiced with simulated and real data from a variety of fields. Variable selection and model performance evaluation are introduced to check model efficiency. Adequate models are used to perform predictions. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: ST 331) 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    DS 496 - Data Science Capstone


    The capstone course provides students with a comprehensive learning experience that integrates ideas and experiences gained from the three core disciplines of mathematics, statistics and computer science, and applies them to their chosen application domain. Working with a family advisor, students will engage in the process of solving a real-world data science problem. 

    Credits: 1-2
  
  •  

    DS 701 - Introduction to Data Science


    The increasing abundance of data in all areas of society has led to a major need for professionals trained in the proper collection, management, and analysis of data. In this course, students will be introduced to the basic principles of data science, with a focus on the application of these principles to answer questions in a wide variety of fields. Specific attention will be given to the definition of data, finding appropriate data sources, methods for collecting data, and how data is processed after it has been collected (cleaning, coding, and manipulation). Students will also be introduced to basic data analysis and data presentation. At the conclusion of the course, students will be prepared to begin exploring data on their own and to take more advanced data science courses.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    DS 702 - Data Collection and Management and Coding


    In this course, you will learn about the practical basics of data collection and management for research purposes. In a research setting, data may be collected to learn about human behavior or physical phenomena, or—more broadly—to discover and disseminate knowledge. You will explore different methods used for data collection, data management, and graphic representation of data. Throughout the course, you will get firsthand experience in these different areas by working with real and simulated data. Successfully finishing the course should prepare you to begin collecting, managing, coding, and graphically diagramming data on your own. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    DS 703 - Biostatistical Analysis


    Health science professionals must be able to analyze, understand, and describe health data to improve patients’ health and the care that they receive.

    In this course, you will explore the basic concepts of statistics, such as probability, measures of central tendency, P values, confidence intervals, and random variation. You will also learn how to perform biostatistical analyses, including chi-square, t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), correlation, and linear and logistic regression. Also presented are examples of factors that may impact these analyses, including confounding and effect modification. 

    Lastly, you will learn how to effectively present your data visually in tables and graphs. This course prepares you to understand more advanced biostatistical analyses, to read and interpret biostatistical literature, and to ultimately perform your own biostatistical studies.

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    DS 704 - Introduction to Statistical Programming


    Almost all statistical analysis is performed using statistical software. The use of statistical software makes it possible to organize, manipulate, and analyze large amounts of data in an efficient manner. In this course, you will be introduced to one particular statistical software package, SAS (Statistical Analysis Software), and learn how to use its key functions. You will learn about basic concepts and methods for getting data into SAS, as well as focus on the challenges of exporting data from SAS and debugging its programs. In addition, you will learn how to work with information in SAS by modifying data and using macros, and finally, you will perform different types of data visualization and statistical analysis procedures.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EC 101 - Introduction to Macroeconomics


    Fundamentals of economic theory with discussion of national income, money and banking, determination of income and employment, economic fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, and balance of payments.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EC 201 - Introduction to Microeconomics


    Discussion of theory of demand, supply, elasticity, utility, production and cost, perfectly and imperfectly competitive markets, marginal productivity, and income distribution.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EC 399 - Independent Study in Economics


    Available to students to work in an area of particular interest under the direction of a faculty member of the department. May be elected more than once for one, two, or three credits.
     

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    EC 490 - Introduction to Health Economics


    An application of micro- and macroeconomics to the fields of healthcare provision and policy. Topics will include healthcare demand versus need, costs, structure of the healthcare market, labor, hospitals, managed care, insurance, pharmaceutical interventions, and practice patterns.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: EC 201 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EC 498 - Directed Research in Economics


    Independent research opportunities in economics are available to self-directed, motivated students to expand their knowledge in an area of particular interest under the direction of a faculty member of the department. The student must plan the independent study project with the faculty member during the semester preceding the semester in which the study is to begin. Preparation of an acceptable research paper and annotated bibliography required. In-depth knowledge of the area selected will be expected.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: two courses in the selected area or the equivalent, and permission of instructor)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    EL 102 - ESL Listening/Speaking I


    This course is a listening/speaking course that will focus on developing natural conversational speaking skills, spoken vocabulary, idiomatic language, pronunciation, stress, intonation, and listening skills. Mini-lectures, mini-presentations, and role-play will be used to develop and improve English listening and speaking skills. This course may not be used to fulfill any graduation requirements.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: placement testing)
    (Note: only offered in the fall semester)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EL 103 - ESL Listening/Speaking II


    This course will expand on the skills introduced in EL 102 and focus on developing vocabulary and listening/speaking skills necessary for academic studies. Essential academic speech skills such as reporting, paraphrasing, and explaining will be developed. Students will improve pronunciation accuracy and speak with greater fluency. Note-taking and presentation skills will be introduced. Improved pronunciation and oral grammar will be developed, as well as the use of body language and facial expressions in spoken language. This course may not be used to fulfill any graduation requirements.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: EL 102 or placement testing)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EL 104 - ESL Listening/Speaking III


    This course will expand on academic lecture listening/note-taking and speaking skills essential for analyzing, evaluating, defending, debating, and presenting. Interviewing skills will be introduced. Pronunciation, stress, intonation, fluency, oral grammar, nonverbal body language, and gestures and facial expressions in spoken language will be continually developed. This course may not be used to fulfill any graduation requirements.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: EL 103 or placement testing)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EL 105 - ESL Reading and Writing I


    A reading/writing course for students whose first language is not English. Students will have the opportunity to improve their academic reading, writing, grammar,, vocabulary, paraphrasing, summarizing, dictionary search, and critical-thinking skills. This course may not be used to fulfill any graduation requirements.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EL 106 - ESL Reading and Writing II


    An advanced reading/writing course for students whose first language is not English. Students will continue improving and enhancing their academic reading, writing, grammar, vocabulary, paraphrasing, outlining, summarizing, and critical-thinking skills. Students will also be introduced to documentation and the research paper process and experience. The course also emphasizes pre-writing, drafting, and revising. This course may not be used to fulfill any graduation requirements.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: EL 105 or placement course)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EL 107 - ESL Reading and Writing III


    A developmental course in reading and writing for students whose first language is not English, this course will further develop the skills students acquire in EL106 through a systematic study of the practice in grammar and vocabulary, the writing process, essay organization, and reading comprehension. This course will focus on writing that takes a position on an issue (argumentative writing) and on grammatical features not covered in previous courses. This course may not be used to fulfill any graduation requirements.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: EL 106 or placement course)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 201 - Introduction to Literature


    Investigation of poetry, fiction, and drama as different types of literature.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 302 - Scientific Writing


    Lectures, discussion, and practice in organizing and communicating information. Topics covered include audience analysis, correspondence, memo and report writing, editing skills, and news writing and reporting.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: third-year status)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 303 - Creative Writing: Playwriting


    This course will focus on the craft, techniques, and devices used to construct believable characters, crisp dialogue, and compelling stories. Studying a wide range of contemporary and classic plays will allow writers to understand new and traditional forms.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 304 - Creative Writing: Fiction


    This course will introduce students to the craft of writing short fiction. Students will read short works of fiction, keep writing journals, and present short stories of their own to the class.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 305 - Argumentation and Critical Thought


    Provides students with intensive exposure to the nature of critical thought through the rhetorical mode called argumentation.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 306 - Creative Writing: Poetry


    This course will introduce students to the craft of writing poetry. Student poems will be analyzed in class workshops, and students will revise their work to strengthen form and thematic content. Readings will include classic and contemporary forms of poetry.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 307 - Creative Writing: Nature Writing


    A fusion of creative and expository writing with scientific observation and inquiry (nature, landscape, environmental issues). Students will take part in excursions outside the classroom.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 308 - Creative Nonfiction


    Creative writing and literary analysis of the “fourth genre”: creative nonfiction.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 312 - Modern Drama and Theatre


    Reading and analysis of 10 to 12 modern plays. Course deals with playwrights’ ideas and techniques. Opportunities for role-playing and class participation.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 314 - The Short Story


    Survey of short fiction of the 19th and 20th centuries, including American, British, and European writers. 
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 102)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 317 - Women in Literature


    Survey of prose fiction, poetry, and drama about and by women in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Britain and the United States. Historical perspective and study of women writers who have enlarged significantly our view of human experience.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 318 - Major American Writers


    The course provides a survey of major American writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry from colonial times to the present.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 320 - Popular Fiction in America


    Study of three genres of popular fiction (the Gothic, detective fiction, and the Western) and the role of popular fiction in the American literary tradition.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 324 - Asian-American Autobiography


    A study of selected Asian-American autobiographies exploring common themes.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 325 - Asian-American Literature


    A study of selected works of Asian-American literature (fiction, drama, poetry, and autobiography) exploring common themes in the Asian-American experience.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 327 - Introduction to Linguistics


    A general introduction to linguistics, the scientific study of human language, with a focus on the core areas of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, as well as on social aspects of language.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 328 - Modern English Grammar


    A descriptive (as opposed to prescriptive) account of the grammar of modern English, focusing primarily on morphology and syntax but with some attention given to phonology and dialects. This is a course on how the English language works, not on “correct” usage.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 329 - Medicine and Literature


    Through analysis of fiction, drama, poetry and film, this course explores attitudes toward illness and healing, disabilities, epidemics and plagues, and the perceptions of patients, physicians and the public.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 330 - Introduction to Journalism


    Class covers news writing and editing strategies.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 332 - Acting & Scene Study


    This course offers an introduction to acting, theatre history, and literary analysis. Students will read and perform scenes from classic plays in order to see how the methods of the actor both create and resolve problems of meaning, historical context, and literary value; work will focus on monologue, dialogue, and ensemble performances. This course satisfies the Oral Communication General Education Skill and can be applied toward the General Education Humanities Discipline requirement. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 333 - Business Writing


    Emphasis on writing the most common forms of business communications from brief e-mails to reports and proposals.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: WR 101)
    (Note: Not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 334 - American Fiction to 1860


    This course examines American prose fiction from the 18th century to about 1860, with particular focus on the seduction novel, the picaresque/satirical novel, gothic fiction, romantic fiction, the sentimental novel, the beginnings of African-American fiction, and the beginnings of realism.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 335 - American Fiction: The Age of Realism


    This course examines American fiction in the Age of Realism, the period between the Civil War and the beginning of World War I. Primary focus will be on literary realism and naturalism, but some attention may be paid to the beginning of modernism as well.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 336 - Modern American Fiction


    This course examines American prose fiction from about 1914 to 1960, focusing on major modern American trends and movements such as modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, radical fiction, and the persistence of naturalism. Specific readings may change from semester to semester and will include both canonical and noncanonical writers.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    EN 337 - The Best of Latin American Literature


    This course seeks to introduce students to the cultures of Latin American through literature. By examining a variety of authors and literary genres, students will become familiar with issues of cultural formation, gender, ethnicity, and other important themes in Latin American civilization. The social and political impact of Latin American writers in the struggle for social change in Latin American literature, and the interplay between Latin American literature and film are also examined. 

     

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    EN 340 - Special Topics in English


    Investigation of literature, creative writing, literary theory, or a related interdisciplinary combination.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    EN 399 - Independent Study in English


    An in-depth project in some area of literature, literary theory, creative writing, or related interdisciplinary combination.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 1 to 3

  
  •  

    EN 498 - Directed Study in English


    Capstone course option for completion of the creative writing minor or the literature minor.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    ET 301 - Ethics in Health Care


    Designed for students to discuss and understand ethical issues in contemporary health care. Seminar format. Case study approach utilized to apply principles of major ethical systems to realistic problems in today’s health care environment.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: open to all majors from third to final year, with permission of instructor) (Not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ET 303 - Ethics & Critical Thought


    This course presents opportunities for students to learn the skills of ethical deliberation. Course material covers the nature of ethics, its place in philosophical thought, and the application of ethical principles and theories to real-world scenarios. Students will read and attempt to think through ethical dilemmas using the process of moral reasoning.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    ET 313 - Business Ethics


    This is a course in applied ethics with a focus on ethical issues arising in commercial life. Basic ethical theories will be studied and deployed in the analysis and evaluation of case studies on select issues in business ethics.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FS 400 - Forensic Science Internship


    Students participate in an intern experience in forensic science. This will typically involve a structured series of modular experiences that provide exposure to varied aspects of forensic investigations within the student’s chosen area of interest. A “hands-on” experience is possible but not required.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: FS 201, and either BS 104 or BS 131, and either CH 102/104 or CH 112/114, and either PY 202 or PY 212, and MA 102, and permission of mentor, student’s major dept. chair, and director of forensic science program)

    Credits: 3 to 6
  
  •  

    FT 115 - Exercise Science and Wellness Management Orientation


    This course is an introduction to the exercise science and wellness management major. An overview of the major and employment opportunities will be presented.
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    FT 190 - CPR/AED/First Aid Professional Rescuer


    This course will train students to act in emergency situations, to recognize and care for life-threatening cardiac and respiratory emergencies in adults, children, and infants. Students will also learn how to protect themselves and others from disease transmission through preventative measures from bloodborne pathogens, utilize two-rescuer cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and handle oxygen delivery, bag valve mask resuscitation, asthma inhalers, and epinephrine auto-injection. This course will satisfy the requirements for American Red Cross Professional Rescuer Adult, Child, and Infant Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/Automated External Defibrillation/First Aid Certification.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 260 - Health and Wellness


    This course will use a health and wellness continuum. Lifestyle management will be studied including healthy life decisions about levels of physical activity, eating habits, obesity, tobacco use, substance use and abuse, responsible sexual behaviors, mental health, ways to avoid injury, violence prevention, importance of immunizations, and access to healthcare.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 301 - Exercise Physiology


    This course will investigate energy systems, physiological adaptations to exercise and exercise nutrition. Laboratory will provide opportunities for application of knowledge and problem solving. This course will satisfy the following

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: FT 260 or FT 460 and BS 311 or BS 206)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    FT 302 - Cardiovascular Pathophysiology


    This course will present an overview of coronary heart disease (CHD); it’s scope, etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. The course will also focus on electrocardiogram (EKG) principles and interpretation at an introductory level.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: BS 311 and FT 200; or instructor permission)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 303 - Exercise Testing and Prescription


    This course will explore the various aspects of health-related physical fitness components (Cardiorespiratory, muscular, body composition, flexibility) and several skill-related physical fitness components (coordination, agility, balance, speed, power). Emphasis will be placed on the process of selecting and administering fitness assessment, interpreting results, and creating an exercise prescription, for a variety of populations (sedentary, chronic disease, athletic) that follows current standards set by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). In addition, aspects of behavior modification and goal setting will be explored, all through both a lecture and hands-on laboratory experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: FT 260 or FT 460)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    FT 310 - Ethics in Sport


    This course will provide students with the opportunity to examine personally held ethical beliefs as well as the ethical dilemmas in past and current sporting events including legal repercussions of participant actions. This course will assist students in defining and understanding legal, ethical, and professional judgment in sport.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 320 - Sport Psychology


    The course will provide an overview of the psychosocial aspect of sport and exercise. Topics will include various psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 350 - Research Methods in Kinesiology


    The course will provide an overview of the research process and available methods useful for students researching within all subdisciplines of kinesiology and exercise science.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 351 - Research Experience I


    This course will provide students the opportunity to implement and practice the applied application of research methodology, principles and techniques in a research setting with a concentration on health and fitness related research

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: FT 350)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    FT 352 - Research Experience II


    This course will provide students the opportunity to collect data, analyze data, and present finding of research data. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: FT 351 and ST 310)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    FT 360 - Fitness and Sport Nutrition


    This course will examine the relationship between nutrition, exercise, weight management, metabolism, human performance, and disease prevention from various perspectives: scientific principles, consumer knowledge, and holistic health concepts. Intelligent application of information will be encouraged to enable students to succeed in implementing healthy nutritional practices in their own lives.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 380 - Intro to Kinesiology


    This course presents an introduction to the study of human movement, while analyzing the principles of anatomy, physiology, and physics and how they relate to muscular control and mechanics of the body affecting athletic performance and fitness activities.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 400 - American Council on Exercise Personal Trainer Certification


    This course will give students the knowledge and understanding necessary to prepare for the ACE Personal Trainer Certification Exam and become effective personal trainers. The ACE Integrated Fitness Training™ (ACE IFT™) Model is used as a comprehensive system for designing individualized programs based on each client’s unique health, fitness, and goals. Students will learn how to facilitate rapport, adherence, self-efficacy, and behavior change in clients, as well as design programs that help clients to improve posture, movement, flexibility, balance, core function, cardiorespiratory fitness, and muscular endurance and strength.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 401 - Advanced Exercise Physiology


    This course is designed to provide the student with advanced understanding of physiological changes and adaptations corresponding to exercise and the factors which affect physiological function during exercise such as nutrition, age, disease, gender, and the environment. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: FT 200, C or better)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 410 - Sport and Media


    This course is designed to help students more critically view the role of sport media in American culture. The influence of/relationship between sport media and issues such as race, gender, sexuality (homophobia), nationalism, capitalism/consumerism, violence, and civic life will be examined. Issues in relation to journalism ethics and the production of sport media also will be examined.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 411 - Principles of Strength and Conditioning


    This course introduces students to advanced concepts in strength and conditioning for sport performance. Special emphasis will be placed on muscle physiology, training adaptations, and strength and conditioning program design for the athletic population. Additionally, this course will include hands on strength and conditioning technique training. This course is ideal for students who wish to become NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BS 311 or instructor permission)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 431 - Exercise Pharmacology


    This course is designed to provide the student with a foundation for understanding basic pharmacology including how drugs affect the physiological processes in the body and how the body handles the absorption, metabolism, and excretion of drugs. Special emphasis is placed on how exercise can alter the efficacy of a drug and how a drug can impact performance. Additionally, sports nutrition and the ergogenic properties of nutrients will be discussed.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: BS 311 and CH 101; or instructor permission) 

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    FT 450 - Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries


    This course will provide entry-level knowledge in sports injuries and the art of the science of injury prevention for the physically active population. The anatomy and physiology of common injuries, evaluation techniques, prevention measures, and treatment procedures will be explored.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 460 - Health and Wellness


    Lifestyle management will be studied, including health decisions about levels of physical activity, eating habits and obesity, tobacco and substance use and abuse, responsible sexual behaviors, mental health, ways to avoid injury, violence prevention, environmental quality, importance of immunization, and access to healthcare.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 480 - Fitness, Sport, and Health Management


    This course will introduce students to fitness, health, and sport principles as they apply to management, leadership style, communication, and motivation. Students will learn about careers in the industry and acquire the knowledge and skills needed to be an effective manager.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 481 - Internship I


    Students will demonstrate their understanding of fitness, health, sport, and recreation principles as they apply to management, leadership style, communication, motivations, and a career in the industry by participating in an internship. Students will begin to practice the knowledge and skills needed to be an effective athletic director, fitness coach, or industrial health promoter.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: FT 480)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 482 - Internship II


    Students will demonstrate their leadership, program management skills, communication abilities, and integration of classroom and experiential learning in an internship. Students will understand the context of program management and outcomes management.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: FT 481)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 483 - Fitness and Health Management Internship


    Students will demonstrate their understanding of fitness, sport, recreation, and health principles as they apply to organizing, planning, implementing wellness events and activities in the industry by participating in an internship. Students will practice the knowledge and skills needed to be an effective exercise physiologist, fitness and sports trainer, sport coach or health education specialist in an offsite internship with a health and wellness professional.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: FT 302, FT 401, and FT 431)

    Credits: 6
  
  •  

    FT 490 - Special Topics


    This course will vary according to the specialty topic offered. The course will give students the opportunity to experience seminars that are timely and topical.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: FT 260 or FT 460)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    FT 491 - Senior Capstone


    This capstone course requires independent and group work and an integration of all the classroom and life experiences of students. Students will select a project with the approval of an instructor and program director. Students will complete a project that requires management, leadership, communication, and career planning.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: FT 302 and FT 401)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GL 275 - Environmental Geology


    Covers relationships between human activities and the geological environment. Includes the study of natural hazards, natural resources, and waste disposal in the geological environment. Required for students majoring in environmental science; open to all others.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: BS 119 and BS 120 or BS 133 and BS 135 or BS 137, and CH 102 or CH 112, or permission of instructor)
    (Note: offered in alternate years)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GN 701 - Introduction to Genomics


    This course explores the history of genetics and genomics. Family history is discussed as a vital part of a genetic risk assessment and tool for the evaluation of inheritance patterns and penetrance of the disease. The course concludes with a review of the epigenetic influences on health and epidemiologic approaches to evaluate health and disease and applications in genomics.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GN 702 - Genetic Concepts Testing and Translation to Healthcare


    The course will serve as the basis for the health care professional to integrate genetics and genomics into personalized health care. The course provides a review of sources of information available to you and clinicians in genomic health care for clinical management and therapeutic applications.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GN 703 - Ethical, Legal, Social Issues in Genomics and Pharmacogenomics


    This course exposes students to the ethical, legal, and social issues surrounding genetic testing and available direct-to-consumer genetic testing. This course will explore approaches for engaging individuals as partners in their healthcare, as well as the expanding applications of pharmacogenomics.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GN 704 - Cancer Genomics and Applications of Genomics in Health and Disease


    This course focuses on the role of genetics and genomics in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Future directions of genetics and genomics with comprehensive genome/exome/transcriptome sequencing in oncology, polygenic risk scores, cell-free DNA, and genome-wide and phenome-wide association studies are addressed. Genomic technologies and computational approaches that are driving advances to manage health and treat disease will be reviewed.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GN 710 - Principles of Genetics


    This course provides you with an introduction to genetics, with a focus on transmission and molecular genetics. The course makes use of bioinformatics to explore gene function and covers pertinent applications of bioinformatics and genetics to modern biological problems. Topics include chromosome structure and replication, variations and extensions of transmission genetics, genetic linkage and mapping, regulation of gene expression, epigenetics, genetic mutations, genetics of cancer, and the principles of genetic engineering.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GN 715 - Chromosomes and Human Disease


    This course introduces you to the role of chromosomes in human disease and seeks to familiarize you with the field of cytogenetics, the study of chromosomes, and the relationship between chromosomal abnormalities and human disease. Topics covered include cytogenetic methodology, aneuploidy, chromosome rearrangements, chromosomes and sex determination, and chromosomes and cancer.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GN 720 - Molecular Basis of Human Inherited Disease


    This course seeks to familiarize you with the molecular basis of diseases of human genetics and its applications to modern research. You will undertake a comprehensive examination of the principles of human inheritance in the context of both normal human variation and human disease. The course explores mechanisms of gene regulation and introduces you to current methods in genome analysis. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GN 725 - Clinical Applications of Genetics and Genomics


    The course focuses on the genetic basis of disease and cytogenic analysis for applications to clinical care. Diagnostic molecular approaches and the clinical translation of genetic and genomic health information in a personalized healthcare environment are explored.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GN 730 - Evolutionary Analysis


    This course introduces you to evolutionary science and population genetics, with a focus on the importance of four factors: selection, migration, mutation, and genetic drift. You will evaluate human evolution and its impact on health.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GN 735 - Human Population Genetics


    The sequencing of the human genome has led to the emergence of population genomics. This course covers the basics of population genomic analysis, from SNP data to the key analyses that may be required to successfully analyze a population genetic data set. Population genetics topics will also include computational methods and machine learning techniques.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    GN 740 - Public Health Genetics


    Public health ensures the basic conditions required for individual and population health are present. The role of genetics is evolving, as is the understanding of genetic disease. This course provides students with advances in genetic knowledge and technology that could be used to prevent disease and improve public health. 

    Credits: 3
 

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