May 23, 2022  
2020-2021 University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    HP 785 - Advocacy and Health Policy


    A systems approach to understanding how to advocate for improvements in policies and regulations. How values influence ideas and interpretation of outcomes. Students will identify an issue, explore options with stakeholders, develop a policy proposal, defend the ideas and assess the initial impact of their work. Community interface is required. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HP 790 - Introduction to Health Economics


    This course provides an introduction to and application of micro- and macroeconomics in the fields of healthcare provision and policy. Specifically, students are instructed in basic economic concepts: utility, marginal analysis, demand, elasticity, costs, supply, opportunity costs, market structure, and private, public, and social goods in terms of micro-economic theory, as well as national GDP, income, fiscal, and monetary policy described by the tenets of macro-economics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: HP 750 or other introductory statistics course satisfactory to instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HP 791 - Advanced Health Economics


    This course applies economic theory to health policy issues and analysis. The focus is on current health policy debates, including insurance reform, the uninsured, hospital behavior, financing, and government involvement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: HP 790 or other introductory economics course satisfactory to instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HP 792 - Healthcare in Developing Countries


    This course covers healthcare issues specific to low- and middle-income countries. It focuses on the role of health in development, financing of healthcare services, and evaluation of healthcare programs.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HP 794 - Master’s Capstone Paper


    This course provides support and guidance for health policy students in the master’s program who are writing their master’s paper.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: must have completed all other coursework required in the MS program)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    HP 806 - Health Services & Policy I


    This is the first of a two-course sequence that provides students with knowledge of the basic structure of the American healthcare system. This course provides a political science-oriented approach, where students examine the US health care system in terms of its key components and their interrelations, and refines their ability to identify health policy issues in terms of conflicts and underlying themes. 

     

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    HP 807 - Health Services & Policy II


    This is the second of a two-course sequence that provides students with knowledge of the basic structure of the American healthcare system. Using an historical approach, the course covers the historical development of key elements of the healthcare system, and develops students’ ability to identify how institutions develop as a result of political and structural dynamics. 

     

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    HP 808 - Health Services and Policy


    This course provides students with knowledge of the basic structure of the American healthcare system, in terms of its key components and their interrelations, and refines their ability to identify health policy issues in terms of conflicts and underlying themes.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HP 809 - Comparative Health Systems


    This course presents a survey of health systems in industrialized and developing countries with emphasis on comparisons with the American system. Students are taught to understand the ways that health systems work in other countries and thereby to better analyze policy issues affecting American healthcare.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HP 810 - Research Methods


    This course will introduce students to evaluation and use of published research reports, ethical conduct of research, use of theories, models and conceptual frameworks, commonly used research methodologies, primary data collection methods, secondary data assessment, and dissemination of research findings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: HE 710 or HP 750 and HP 730)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HP 811 - Application of Research Methods


    Students will collaborate to design and carry out small research projects considering conceptual frameworks, ethics, data collection and analysis, dissemination of findings. In parallel, students will develop brief project proposals and budgets for their own research topics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: HE 710 or HP 750, HP 730 and HP 810)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HP 812 - Public Health Infrastructure


    This course focuses on the various systems that provide public health services. In addition to covering the basic concepts needed to understand public health infrastructure, the course focuses on Philadelphia in terms of local public health issues and providers. The central issues and principal providers related to public health in an urban setting, the degree to which this represents a coordinated infrastructure, and the gaps within this system are studied.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HP 813 - Introduction to Research Design for Health Policy


    This course will introduce students to evaluating and using published research reports, ethical conduct of research, use of theories, models and conceptual frameworks, commonly used research methodologies, primary data collection methods, secondary data assessment, and dissemination of research findings.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: HE 710 or HP 750 and HP 730 

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    HP 814 - Application of Research Methods in Health Policy


    Students will collaborate to design and carry out small research projects considering conceptual frameworks, ethics, data collection and analysis, dissemination of findings. In parallel, students will develop brief project proposals and budgets for their own research topic. 

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: HE 710 or HP 750, HP 730, and HP 813) 

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    HP 818 - Health Services & Policy B


    This is the second of a two-course sequence that provides students with knowledge of the basic structure of the American healthcare system. Using an historical approach, the course covers the historical development of key elements of the healthcare system, and develops students’ ability to identify how institutions develop as a result of political and structural dynamics.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HP 820 - Proposal Writing


    This course teaches doctoral students in health policy the elements of preparing a formal proposal for conducting research. Emphasis is placed on presenting analytical concepts in a clear and organized manner and on related writing skills that are applicable across a range of contexts.

     

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    HP 821 - Proposal Writing and Progression Paper


    This course provides support and guidance for health policy students in the PhD program to write a seminar-paper length, publishable piece of original research (referred to here as the progression paper). In addition, the course orients students to the process of taking comprehensive exams and starting on dissertation work.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: students must have completed all other coursework required in the PhD program)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HP 850 - Public Policy Analysis


    This course covers the processes of analyzing public policy decisions. Topics include description of the problem statement, modeling process to assess the economic feasibility of policy, implementation and enactment issues, and evaluation of outcomes.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: HP 790 or other introductory economics course satisfactory to the instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HP 880 - Ethical Issues in Healthcare


    This course includes a critical examination of the central ethical issues in the field of health policy. There is a brief introduction to ethical theory and the various approaches to bioethics. Necessary background in moral philosophy is provided. The implications of ethical decision making for health policy are a central theme of this course.

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    HP 890 - Health Policy Seminar


    To provide students with an overview of the basic skills and tools needed to complete graduate-level work in health policy and public health. An introduction to the department, policy analysis, and graduate courses.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    HP 891 - Health Policy Seminar II


    This course provides students with an overview of the basic skills and tools needed to complete graduate-level work in health policy and public health. An introduction to the department, policy analysis, and graduate courses.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    HP 899 - Doctoral Research


    Doctoral students in health policy are required to fulfill their research requirements under the direction of the health policy faculty.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of the program director)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 20

  
  •  

    HS 110 - Seminar for Health Science


    This course will introduce and familiarize the student with the University. The emphasis will be on the development of skills for academic success and assimilation into the University. The course will also discuss the healthcare professions, cultural competency, and professionalism.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    HS 111 - Health Sciences Orientation II


    Overview of health science professions with specific emphasis on professions represented in Samson College. Topics will include history of the professions, ethical issues, current healthcare issues, professional behaviors, and professional communication. The roles of various health professionals will be explored.
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    HS 120 - Health Science Orientation I


    This course will introduce and familiarize the student with the University. The emphasis will be on the development of skills for academic success and assimilation into the University. The course will also discuss the healthcare professions, cultural competency, and professionalism.
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    HS 210 - Health and Social Participation


    Explores how participation in community and social activities affects the health of individuals and the community. Students engage in active and service-learning experiences to understand the teaching and learning process to facilitate an individual’s participation in social activity. The student will be matched with community sites to develop innovative activity-based community projects and to assess and measure the health benefits of the project.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HS 220 - Disability and Social Participation


    This course will provide students with an opportunity to learn about the lived experience of persons with disabilities and their participation in society. In addition, students will study the role of the social, cultural, and physical environment in providing opportunities and/or barriers to participation of all persons. Students will participate in service-learning experiences to enhance their knowledge through interactions with people with disabilities during sports and leisure activities.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HS 230 - Introduction to Mindfulness


    This course will introduce students to the science and practice of mindfulness. Students will explore the physical, cognitive, and psychological effects of mindfulness practices and the use of mindfulness based interventions in healthcare. Students will also be introduced to several mindfulness practices, including mindfulness of the breath and body, thoughts, emotions, and the practice of compassion. This course is designed to be experiential in nature, and help students to establish a personal mindfulness practice.

     

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    HS 240 - Stress Management & Resilience


    The goal of this course is to discuss stress and its effect on health and wellness, and explore stress management and resilience-enhancing strategies from physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and spiritual perspectives. Students will define stress and explore theories of stress adaptation, understand the empirical basis of stress management interventions, experiment with physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and spiritual stress management strategies, and explore responses to failure and trauma. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HS 260 - Peer Health Educator


    This course provides an introduction to health education, health promotion and peer education.  Students will develop communication, leadership, facilitation, and presentation skills while exploring topics relevant to the health and well-being of college students. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to serve as peer educators in one or more health domains/ topics. Students will also be eligible to take the BACCHUS/NASPA Certified Peer Educator certifying exam and upon successful completion of the exam, receive the Certified Peer Educator designation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Special Registration Restrictions: U2 and above)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HS 261 - Peer Health Educator II


    This course provides further training in peer health education. Students will be mentored as they further develop their program planning and presentation skills. Students will also have the opportunity to provide health promotion workshops and presentations to the campus community under the guidance of faculty/ staff mentors.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: HS 260)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    HS 310 - Human Learning


    This course will present an overview of the major principles and theories of human learning that have evolved over the past century and how they have been applied in formal education and other contexts of human learning. There will be emphasis on understanding the complex issues of motivation, metacognition, and especially problem solving as a meaningful expression of learning. Students will also have the opportunity to explore how the principles of learning have impacted their past educational experiences and will affect their future roles as patient/student educators, as well as the implications for their own personal development.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HS 320 - Leadership in Service to the Community


    This course will explore service learning, the foundations of leadership, and change theory. Students will analyze models of leadership, methods of leading, characteristics of effective leaders, and change implementation. Class participants will have the opportunity to apply knowledge gained from classroom discussions by participating in the service-learning activities focused on the administration of community programs.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HS 330 - Health Promotion for the Elderly


    This course will provide students with an opportunity to study the issues impacting the health of the older population. Students will learn how to successfully develop and implement health education programs for this population. Service-learning experiences will enhance students’ knowledge through interactions with the older population.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HS 399 - Independent Study in Health Sciences


    Available to students to work in an area of particular interest under the direction of a faculty member in the Samson College of Health Sciences. May be taken for one, two, or three credits.
     

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    HS 400 - Introduction to Interprofessional Education


    This course will introduce students to the concept of interprofessional education and the core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice which include: ethics for interprofessional practice, roles/responsibilities, interprofessional communication and teams/teamwork.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Special registration restriction: Open to U4 and P1 students) 

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    HS 410 - Fieldwork


    Fieldwork provides current or prospective health care students a chance to observe health care professionals in various workplace/clinical settings. The shadowing experience is designed to be an observation only experience lasting 45 hours. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: Open only to HS students) 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HS 415 - Falls in the Elderly


    The problem of falls has a profound impact on the physical functioning of community-dwelling elders and presents significant challenges to healthcare providers. This service-learning course is designed to give health professional students the opportunity to carry out health-related community service within the context of an academic-learning experience. Students will study the multiple issues regarding this specific problem, work with a community-based healthcare program to identify elders who are at risk for falls or who have a history of falling, integrate their academic and disciplinary backgrounds to determine risk factors for specific elders, and develop problem-solving skills to make recommendations for interventions to reduce those risks.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HS 430 - Survey of Public Health


    This survey course introduces students to major concepts and methods in public health practice. Topics include the history, scope, and techniques used by practitioners. Epidemiology, population-based health teaching, environmental health, and health policy will be explored using current events and basic economic principles to demonstrate the way that public health practitioners create and influence health policies and practices.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HS 499 - Advanced Independent Study in Health Science


    Available to students to work in an area of particular interest under the direction of a faculty member in the Samson College of Health Sciences. May be taken for one, two, or three credits.
     

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    HS 521 - Teaching in Health Professions


    This course teaches the essential aspects of course design and how to teach in higher education based upon current evidence-based educational literature. This course emphasizes developing teaching/learning and assessment activities in the student’s own discipline.
     

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    HU 101 - Orientation to Humanities


    Introduction to the various disciplines that constitute the humanities and the ways they may be studied at USciences. Consideration of how the humanities relate to other disciplines in the sciences, social sciences, and fine arts. Designed for majors in humanities, but open to all interested students.
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    HU 206 - Latino Influence in the U.S.


    This course will explore the world of Latinos living in the United States. Cultural similarities and differences demonstrated by individual communities of Latin Americans residing in the United States will be studied.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HU 301 - Studies in Film


    This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic terminology of film analysis and criticism and features or conventions of several genres of film. A variety of classic Hollywood, foreign, and contemporary films will be examined as works of art and as valuable social, historical, and cultural artifacts.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HU 302 - American Culture: The 1920s


    Literature and the arts seen in the cultural context of the decade of the 1920s.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HU 303 - American Culture: The 1930s


    The study of American life in the 1930s using contemporary documents, literature, film, art, and music as sources.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: WR 101)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HU 305 - The Vietnamese-American Experience


    A study of the history, literature, culture, and social experience of Vietnamese Americans from the first wave of refugees in 1975 to the present time.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HU 315 - Spain through Art, Literature, and Film (cross-listed as WC 315)


    A chronological survey of Spain with emphasis on the artistic works that have defined it and have contributed to the culture of the Western world.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HU 317 - Medicine and Hispanics


    This course explores medical and health issues among Hispanics/Latino/as from a multi-disciplinary perspective (film, literature, political science, anthropology). Special attention will be paid to helping students gain an understanding of how diverse the Hispanic/Latino population is, its historical presence in the US through conquest and immigration, the current health and medical issues affecting this population, and various policies targeting this population.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HU 319 - Queer Film


    This course is an introduction to some of the best queer (LGBTQ) films made in the last few decades. In attempting to answer “what is queer film?” we’ll examine a range of film styles and themes related to queer identity, and explore how these portrayals shape and reflect public attitudes.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

     

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    HU 325 - Art Masterpieces


    This course asks ‘what is a masterpiece?’ and identifies specific works of art from Ancient Greece to the mid-20th century that are universally hailed as masterpieces. We’ll investigate how such works developed and functioned, how they looked and were experienced, as well as the effect they had on later art.

     

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    HU 335 - Views of the Cosmos (cross-listed as PY 335)


    An introduction to the study of the universe from scientific, religious, and philosophical standpoints. Surveys mankind’s efforts to understand the nature of the cosmos, including its origins, evolution, and eventual demise. Viewpoints of many religious groups, cultures, and scientific thinkers will be discussed and compared. Contemporary debates in cosmology will be fully explored without mathematics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: two semesters of MD)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HU 340 - Special Topics in the Humanities


    The topics addressed in this course vary.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HU 399 - Independent Study


    Independent study projects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of instructor)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 1 to 3

  
  •  

    HU 470 - Social History of Therapeutics


    This cross-disciplinary course introduces the social history of medical therapy in the United States. Using both primary and secondary sources, it emphasizes the social development of healthcare professions. In particular, to illustrate how tools shape practice, the course considers examples of technology in medicine. By examining artifacts and print materials, students will analyze their meaning and significance within both a social history and therapeutic context.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: upperclass status)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HU 494 - Pre-Capstone


    A preparatory independent study course, usually taken in the semester before graduation, that precedes HU 495, the senior capstone course for Humanities majors. In this course, students identify and refine their research topics, compile and read relevant sources, and begin the process of writing the first draft. Other projects, artistic or otherwise creative in nature, are subject to requirements specified by the faculty supervisor. Completed projects are usually in the 20-30 page range. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Notes: 4th year status or permission of department chair and open only to Humanities majors)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HU 495 - Senior Seminar


    A study organized around an interdisciplinary theme that represents the interests of the participating faculty and students.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: completion of all other required courses for the humanities and science major)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    HU 498 - Directed Study in the Humanities


    Directed study opportunities in the humanities are available to motivated students, enabling them to expand their knowledge in an area of particular interest under faculty direction. The student must plan the directed study project with the department faculty during the semester preceding the semester in which the study is to begin.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: two humanities courses; third-, fourth-, fifth-, or final-year status; and permission of instructor)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    IF 701 - Introduction to Health Informatics


    Introduction to Health Informatics works as an introductory class in two ways: first, it launches your study of health informatics, and second, it commences your work in this MS program. Appropriately, the course itself begins with the basics of health informatics and its related professional roles. From there, you investigate health informatics’ past, present, and future, and begin building your understanding of theories and research that apply to both health information technology (HIT) and evidence-based practice (EBP). Next, you examine administrative and clinical health information systems, including electronic health records (EHRs). In the next few weeks of the course, you consider topics such as the security and privacy of data, the quality of care, and the safety of patients. You conclude your work in this first course by exploring the engagement and experience of patients, as well as the emerging technologies and trends relevant to health informatics.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    IF 702 - Understanding Health Information Systems


    Understanding Health Information Systems is the second course in your certificate program. This course begins by introducing you to the terminology, hardware, and software used in health information technology (HIT). Next, you are introduced to electronic health records (EHRs) to develop an understanding of their advantages and challenges. You also learn about how data are organized in an EHR. Then, you learn about the systems development life cycle (SDLC) and how it is used in decision-making. The course then shifts to data analytics, as you explore the various sources of data used in HIT and how data are used in different types of healthcare facilities. Furthermore, you learn about the importance of interoperability and the challenges of making systems work together. The course ends by examining how the underlying concepts in the Foundation of Knowledge model and the data-information-knowledge-wisdom (DIKW) paradigm help transform data and information into knowledge and wisdom.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    IF 703 - Data Management and Utilization


    Data Management and Utilization is the third course in your certificate program. This course begins by introducing you to the terminology related to data storage and collection and data analytics. In addition, you learn about the emerging technologies used for data analysis. You will learn about data information, data governance, and the ethical considerations of the electronic health record (EHR). In addition, you learn how databases are used to store and collect information. The course then shifts to data analysis, as you explore the types of statistical software used to examine healthcare data. You will learn about data mining and how it is used to look for patterns and trends in healthcare data. Next, you examine the types of data collected in different healthcare facilities and how data is used in decision making and evidence-based practice. The course ends by examining decision support systems (DSSs), the major types of standardized language terminologies used in healthcare, and the certification processes required for interoperability capabilities.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    IF 704 - Strategic Planning in Healthcare Informatics


    Strategic Planning in Health Informatics is the fourth course in your certificate program. This course reinforces key informatics concepts in relation to relevant management, leadership, and strategic planning mechanisms. The course begins by examining the steps in the strategic planning process. The in-depth examination of the systems development life cycle (SDLC) and health information processes that follows includes internal and external audits, needs assessments, requests for information (RFI), and requests for proposals (RFP). You will learn about the process of implementing and evaluating a plan. You will then explore data analytics and how healthcare professionals use data. The course ends by examining healthcare information system (HCIS) standards and information technology (IT) alignment.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    IF 710 - Advanced Technology in Healthcare Informatics


    In this course, you will be introduced to a broad overview of advanced technology and its applications in healthcare informatics. You will explore ways that the changing technology landscape provides new opportunities to improve healthcare efficiency, quality, and outcomes. Advanced technology topics will include the fundamentals of natural language processing (NLP), machine learning, and opportunities to use other aspects of artificial intelligence and precision medicine in a healthcare setting. The integration of wearable health devices into electronic health records (EHR) provides additional opportunities for you to identify problems and promote health.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    IF 715 - Connected Health and Patient Engagement


    This course discusses the principles of connected health and patient engagement. Modes of connected health include the use of mobile technology (m-Health), consumer health, and social media. These modes are used to devise consumer-centered health solutions to improve healthcare outcomes. The course also integrates principles of patient engagement, a method for providing patient advocacy and improving health literacy. You will have an opportunity to evaluate the role of technology in reinforcing patient engagement, patient advocacy, and health literacy. The course will also provide you with a hands-on approach to connected health through assessment of m-Health applications and discussion of leading health indicators as described by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion’s HealthyPeople 2020 initiative.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    IF 720 - Data Management and Clinical Decision Support


    In this course, you will explore a detailed overview of the use of clinical decision support (CDS) systems designed to help sort, organize, and use data. Clinical decision support (CDS) systems assist providers in determining the best treatment options while alerting them to all relevant patient information. You will also learn how to apply data terminology standards and the impact of how data standardization affects clinical decision support systems. You will propose the use of a clinical decision support system in a healthcare setting, in an effort to improve at least one of the following aspects of healthcare: efficiency, quality, and cost.

    In addition, you will learn about the history of knowledge generation for CDS and will practice applying a variety of diagnostic models in addition to analyzing data to identify health problems while using terminologies, ontologies, and vocabularies to promote interoperability among health records. By the end of the course, you will understand how raw data gathered from disparate sources become useful, actionable information for a CDS system.

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    IF 725 - Project and Change Management in Healthcare Informatics


    This course will provide an in-depth look at project and change management, including budget planning, distribution of resources in a project, department design, vendor evaluation, and planning for software implementation and optimization. You will explore factors you need to consider when planning a project, such as needs, priorities, costs, resources, and consequences. This course will also cover strategies for designing a project plan, creating a project budget, and managing a project team. You will also learn how to develop a training plan for new software implementation, and then evaluate whether the project has been successful in the post-implementation phase.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    IF 730 - Research Methods in Healthcare Informatics


    This course provides fundamental information about research design and methodology, particularly as it relates to big data collected within the healthcare industry. The curriculum covers basic research techniques and methods and details their use in the specific setting of healthcare informatics. The Readings of this course offer concise references for research terminology and techniques, as well as illustrative examples that clarify how research is integrated into healthcare practices. You will learn how to identify and formulate solid research questions and how to evaluate recent research reports. You will also learn about analysis and interpretation of quantitative data, as well as how to gather and handle qualitative information. This course also offers a framework for considering and reviewing the ethical concerns that arise from the use of private health data in public research. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    IF 735 - U.S. Healthcare Policy and Politics in Informatics


    This course provides a foundation in health policy analysis with a focus on healthcare informatics-related policies. It provides a method to understand the history of U.S. policy and politics, with a focus on political, economic, and social systems. In this course, you will learn about healthcare policy at both the federal and state levels, including the details of specific informatics-related healthcare acts and the steps involved in healthcare policy making and implementation. You will also learn how healthcare is brought into the political arena, which U.S. congressional committees are responsible for healthcare policy, and which healthcare agendas and policies are priorities for the current presidential administration. You will explore the impacts and potential challenges of healthcare informatics-related policies and consider possible solutions to these challenges. In the process, you will examine how health information can be stored and shared, and how this storage of information affects the quality of care that patients receive.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    IF 750 - Public Health Information and Telehealth


    In this course, you will use the concepts of informatics in the setting of public health. You will discuss the importance of surveillance, reporting, and health promotion. Fundamentals of population health informatics and how it intersects with public health informatics will be discussed. You will also examine the role of telehealth in promoting health and mitigating health disparities in certain populations. This course will also review specific health concerns for certain groups of people, rather than individuals, and how positive health outcomes are promoted in specific populations.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    IF 751 - Healthcare Quality Improvement


    Stakeholders at all levels rely upon healthcare administrators to deliver safe and high-quality services in the healthcare organization. Further, the move toward value-based care has driven providers to conduct more rigorous evaluation of patient safety and performance. In this course, students will explore the principles of quality management and quality improvement. Utilizing case studies and other learning methodologies, this course will discuss quality improvement models, protect teams, collaboration, and systems within the healthcare organization that provide a foundation for delivering safe, high-quality healthcare. The curriculum will provide an overview of the principles of and practical tools for quality improvement, including the strategies of Lean Six Sigma and the Toyota model of quality management. Students will also learn essential management practices for adopting and implementing performance goals for lasting process improvements, strategies for assessing population health, procedures for safe discharge planning, laws and regulations related to healthcare quality, and an understanding of value-based purchasing.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    IS 105 - Introduction to Online Information


    An introduction to finding and evaluating information available in electronic formats. The skillful use of search engines and databases, the construction of effective searches, and the critical evaluation of search results will be emphasized. Elective course for any interested student.
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    IS 205 - Scientific Information


    This course explores the literature of science with particular attention to the literature of the life sciences. Students will learn the types of scientific literature, how to identify the information needed for a particular purpose, and how to find the needed information. The course includes citation managers, non-bibliographic databases, and ethical issues.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: BS 119 or BS 133, CH 102, CH 112, PY 202, or PY 212)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    LA 101 - Elementary Latin I


    Elementary basic knowledge of Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary and the study of simple literary texts.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    LA 102 - Elementary Latin II


    Development of the knowledge of Latin morphology and syntax. Reading from classical texts.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: LA 101, one year of high school Latin, or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 098 - Preparatory Algebra


    Basic algebra with emphasis on those topics that are important as background for precalculus, chemistry, or physics. This course is for entering freshmen with a weakness in algebra.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: offered during the summer only)

    Credits: 0
  
  •  

    MA 100 - Algebra


    Simplifying polynomials, exponents, factoring, rational expressions, complex fractions, linear equations, linear literal equations, non-linear equations, systems of linear and non-linear equations, inequalities, equations of lines, introduction to functions, domain of basic functions and applications. This course does not satisfy the general education mathematics discipline requirement and credits may not be used for graduation.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 104 - College Algebra


    Introduction to functions and graphs, linear functions and equations, quadratic functions and equations, nonlinear functions and equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, modeling data and solving multidisciplinary application problems.  This course is designed for students not required to take calculus or physics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 100 or placement)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 107 - Precalculus


    Introduction to functions and graphs, polynomial functions, rational and radical functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, right triangle trigonometry, and trigonometric functions.  Functions are used for modeling data and solving multidisciplinary application problems.  This course is for students required to take calculus or physics.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 108 - Trigonometry


    Topics include Angle Measurements; Triangles; Trigonometric and Inverse Trigonometric Functions and Graphs; Solving Trigonometric Equations; Essential Trigonometric Identities; Laws of Sine, Cosine, and Tangent; Vectors; Parametric Equations; Polar Coordinates. This course will emphasize application and modeling problems related to the topics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA104 or MA107 or placement)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 110 - General Calculus


    Topics include limits, continuity, rates of change, derivative and techniques of differentiation, analysis of functions using derivatives, relative and absolute extrema, concavity, optimization, implicit differentiation, related rates, and definite and indefinite integral, area, and integration techniques.  Calculus techniques are used for modeling data and solving multidisciplinary application problems.  This course is recommended for students who will not take MA 221, Calculus II.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA107 or placement)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 122 - Calculus I


    Covers limits, continuity, rates of change, derivative and techniques of differentiation, analysis of functions using derivatives, relative and absolute extrema, concavity, optimizing functions, implicit differentiation, related rates, linear approximations, definite and indefinite integrals, integration techniques, and areas. Calculus techniques are used for modeling data and solving multidisciplinary application problems. Appropriate technology is used extensively throughout the course. 
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 107 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    MA 201 - Mathematical Analysis III


    Review of definite and indefinite integrals, areas between curves, volumes, average value of a function, integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, approximate integration, arc length, area of a surface of revolution, differential equations and applications, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. Appropriate technology is used extensively throughout the course.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 102 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    MA 202 - Mathematical Analysis IV


    Study of vectors, lines and planes, three-dimensional surfaces and curves, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, tangent planes, maximum and minimum values, Lagrange multipliers, double integrals, triple integrals, spherical and cylindrical coordinates, vector fields, line integrals, parametric surfaces, sequences, series, convergence tests, power series, and Taylor series. Appropriate technology is used extensively throughout the course.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 201)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    MA 221 - Calculus II


    Review of definite and indefinite integrals, areas between curves, volumes, average value of a function, integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, approximate integration, arc length, area of a surface of revolution, differential equations and applications, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. Appropriate technology is used extensively throughout the course.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 102 or MA 122 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    MA 222 - Calculus III


    Study of vectors, lines and planes, three-dimensional surfaces and curves, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, tangent planes, maximum and minimum values, Lagrange multipliers, double integrals, triple integrals, spherical and cylindrical coordinates, vector fields, line integrals, parametric surfaces, sequences, series, convergence tests, power series, and Taylor series. Appropriate technology is used extensively throughout the course.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 221 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 4
  
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    MA 310 - Mathematical Foundations of Neuroscience


    Topics include Differential Equations, Introduction to Dynamical Systems, the Hodgkin-Huxley Equations, and Mathematical Modeling with an emphasis on Neuroscience. Mathematical software will be used throughout the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 221)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 314 - Discrete Mathematics


    This course provides the mathematical background suitable for a better understanding of, or further study in, mathematics and computer science. Topics will include prepositional logic, set theory, relations, functions, proof by induction, combinations, graph theory, and Boolean algebra.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 110, MA 122 or MA 102)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 315 - History of Mathematics


    A study of the development of mathematics and mathematical reasoning over the centuries, with special emphasis given to the contributions of many cultures and special focus given to the antecedents and future directions of modern mathematical topics and methods.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 110, MA 122 or MA 102)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 316 - Linear Algebra


    Study of systems of linear equations, matrices, vector spaces, linear transformations, determinants, inner products, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, similarity, diagonalization, and quadratic forms.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 110, MA 122 or MA 102)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 320 - Differential Equations


    Course covers ordinary differential equations: first order equations, techniques of finding analytic and numerical solutions, higher order differential equations with constant coefficients, solving equations using Laplace transform, analyzing solutions of systems of equations, and multidisciplinary applications. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 221 or MA 201)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 321 - Fourier Analysis


    Study of mathematical theory of Fourier series and the Fourier transform. Includes solutions to partial differential equations using separation of variables and Fourier series. Also covers applications of the Fourier transform.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 320)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 330 - Geometry


    A course in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries with emphasis on foundations, theories, proof, interconnections, and contemporary applications.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 222 or MA 202)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 340 - Introduction to Graph Theory


    This course is designed as an introduction to graph theory. Topics that will be covered include applications of graphs and digraphs, Eulerian graphs and digraphs, Hamiltonian graphs and digraphs, path algorithms, trees, planarity, coloring graphs, and maps.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 221 or MA 201 or permission of department)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 355 - Mathematical Methods for the Physical Sciences (cross-listed as PY 355)


    An introduction to mathematical methods used in physics and the physical sciences such as vector calculus, Fourier analysis, vector spaces and matrices, special functions, and partial differential equations. These topics are introduced in the context of specific problems in various areas of physics and physical science such as fluid dynamics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, biophysics, and mechanics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 212 and MA 222 or MA 202)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 360 - Topics in Mathematics with Applications to Chemistry


    The following topics are covered: 1. Fourier transform, complex functions, and Fourier series with emphasis on applications to nuclear magnetic resonance and signal processing. 2. Groups, groups of symmetries, classes of groups, and subgroups, with emphasis on applications to chemistry. 3. Basics of programming and its application to recursive formulas in chemistry. Appropriate technology is used extensively throughout the course.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 221 or MA 201)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 370 - Mathematical Methods for the Physical Sciences I (cross-listed as PY 370)


    This course, the first of the two-course sequence, is an introduction to mathematical methods used in physics, chemistry, and physical and related sciences: vector calculus, functions of complex variable, Fourier series, Fourier transform, series solutions of ordinary differential equations, and introduction to group theory.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 222 and PY 212, or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 371 - Mathematical Methods for the Physical Sciences II (cross-listed as PY 371)


    This course, the second of the two-course sequence, is an introduction to further mathematical methods used in physics, chemistry, and physical and related sciences: special functions and partial differential equations. These topics are introduced in the context of specific problems in various areas of physics and physical science such as fluid dynamics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, biophysics, and mechanics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 320 and PY 370/MA 370, or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 410 - Numerical Analysis


    Covers methods of root finding, solving linear and nonlinear systems, interpolation, data fitting and approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, and numerical solution to differential equations.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 320 or permission of instructor)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 415 - Abstract Algebra


    Provides an introduction to the theories, proofs, and methods of abstract algebra.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 110, MA 122 or MA 102)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MA 422 - Mathematical Modeling


    An introduction to the basic formulation of mathematical models with an emphasis on the health and natural sciences. Topics will include discrete and continuous models, dimensional analysis, steady states, and stability.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 221 or MA 201)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
 

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