Jan 23, 2022  
2020-2021 University Catalog 
    
2020-2021 University Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    PT 635 - Health and Business Policy


    This course will orient the student to the principles of business administration and the role of the physical therapist as patient advocate, manager, and business owner. Students will design a new program or product that will be presented to the class in the final project. The project will include components such as access to healthcare, marketing, human resources, and reimbursement as well as appraise their ability to identify health policy issues and effect change.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PT 655, PT 656)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PT 640 - Pro Bono Experience V


    The is the fifth and final course in a series designed to provide all USciences DPT students with structured experiential learning opportunities that are integrated into the curriculum in a step-wise progression beginning in the fall of the first professional year through the completion of the third professional year. Students will build on skills acquired throughout the first and second professional years. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PT 435, PT 470, PT 535, and PT 560)

    (Note: Open to PT students in the professional phase only)

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    PT 654 - Clinical Education II/III


    Intermediate, full-time clinical education experience occurring under the direct supervision of a licensed physical therapist which is second in the series of clinical education.  The purpose of this experience is to develop skill and efficiency in the areas of patient examination, evaluation, clinical reasoning, goal setting, program planning, and intervention implementation for patients in an acute care, post-acute, homecare, or outpatient setting.  Through interactions with patients and other healthcare disciplines, students will have the opportunity to integrate academic coursework into this patient setting. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PT 506, PT 508, PT 509, PT 537, PT 544, PT 556, and PT 567) 

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PT 655 - Clinical Education II


    Intermediate, full-time clinical education experience occurring under the direct supervision of a licensed physical therapist. The purpose of this experience is to develop skill and efficiency in the areas of patient evaluation, evaluation, clinical reasoning, goal setting, program planning, and treatment implementation for patients in an acute care, post-acute, homecare, or outpatient setting. Through interactions with patients and other healthcare disciplines, students will have the opportunity to integrate academic coursework into this patient setting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PT 506, PT 508, PT 509, PT 537, PT 544, PT 566, and PT 567)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PT 656 - Clinical Education III


    Intermediate, full-time clinical education experience occurring under the direct supervision of a licensed physical therapist following Clinical Education II. The purpose of this experience is to develop skill and efficiency in the areas of patient examination, evaluation, clinical reasoning, goal setting, program planning, and intervention implementation for patients in a rehabilitation setting. Through interactions with patients and other healthcare disciplines, students will have the opportunity to integrate academic coursework into this patient setting. This rotation may be completed in an acute care, post-acute, homecare or outpatient setting. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PT 506, PT 508, PT 509, PT 537, PT 544, PT 567, PT 655)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PT 657 - Clinical Education II/III


    Intermediate, full-time clinical education experience occurring under the direct supervision of a licensed physical therapist which is second in the series of clinical education.  The purpose of this experience is to develop skill and efficiency in the areas of patient examination, evaluation, clinical reasoning, goal setting, program planning, and intervention implementation for patients in an acute care, post-acute, homecare, or outpatient setting.  Through interactions with patients and other healthcare disciplines, students will have the opportunity to integrate academic coursework into this patient setting. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PT 506, PT 508, PT 509, PT 537, PT 544, PT 556, and PT 567) 

    Credits: 5
  
  •  

    PT 661 - PT Issues V: Management of Complex Patients


    Emphasizes the development of clinical-reasoning, problem-solving, and decision-making skills and the critical appraisal of evidence for the management of complex patients across the life span. The focus is on comprehensive patient management, including issues related to cultural diversity, psychosocial aspects of disability, and end-of-life issues. Students will design a comprehensive intervention program that is based on reasonable theoretical rationale and is reflective of the research literature and current practice trends.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PT 506, PT 508, PT 509, PT 537, PT 544, PT 567, and PT 580)

    (Special registration restriction: Open only to PT P3 students)

    Credits: 2

  
  •  

    PT 666 - Seminar in Contemporary Physical Therapy Practice


    This course is the “capstone” course for the DPT curriculum. There are two broad themes. First, this course is designed to give students the opportunity to integrate their didactic and experiential education into a capstone project within the context of administration, clinical practice, research, or teaching. Students will work collaboratively with faculty to develop a project with defined objectives, timelines, and anticipated outcomes. Second, students will participate in group discussions that will address issues that prepare them for the contemporary practice of physical therapy in today’s challenging healthcare environment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PT 601, PT 602, PT 612, PT 635, PT 661, and PT 690)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PT 680 - Clinical Education IV A


    This course is the first part of a culminating, full-time clinical education experience occurring under the direct supervision of a licensed physical therapist. The purpose of this experience is to promote independence and proficiency in the areas of patient examination, evaluation, goal setting, program planning, intervention implementation, clinical decision-making, and administrative planning in a setting that will meet the educational needs of each student individually. Through interactions with patients and other healthcare disciplines, students will have the opportunity to integrate academic coursework into a variety of patient settings. This rotation may be completed in an acute care hospital, post-acute rehabilitation unit, outpatient center, early intervention/school setting, home care, specialty care, or combination of above.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PT 655 and PT 656; corequisites: PT 603, PT 635, and PT 661)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PT 681 - Clinical Education IV B


    This course is a continuation of PT 670. Culminating, full-time clinical education experience occurring under the direct supervision of a licensed physical therapist. The purpose of this experience is to promote independence and proficiency in the areas of patient examination, evaluation, goal setting, program planning, intervention implementation, clinical decision making, and administrative planning in a setting that will meet the educational needs of each student individually. Through interactions with patients and other healthcare disciplines, students will have the opportunity to integrate academic coursework into a variety of patient settings. This rotation may be completed in an acute care hospital, post-acute rehabilitation unit, outpatient center, early interventions/school setting, home care, specialty area or combination of above.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PT 603, PT 635, PT 656, PT 661, and PT 670)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PT 690 - Independent Study in Physical Therapy


    Students work independently on a special project under the direction of a preceptor.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    PT 699 - Research Practicum


    Students collaborate with faculty on scholarly work.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 1 to 3
  
  •  

    PY 100 - Physics Orientation


    In this orientation course students are presented with an overview of all aspects of physics, including current topics, career opportunities in the field, academic standards, and integrity, as well as general information about the University and services that help students achieve academic success.
     

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PY 200 - Survey of Physics


    Covers the basic concepts in physics, including biological and medical applications of pressures and fluids, bioelectricity, biodynamics, and kinesiology.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite or corequisite: MA 107 or MA 108 or MA 110 or MA 122)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PY 201 - Introductory Physics I


    Algebra- and trigonometry-based general physics course covering principles of mechanics and heat with applications to the health sciences. First course in a two-semester course sequence. This course in not interchangeable with one-semester physics courses such as PY 200 or PY 205.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 107)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PY 202 - Introductory Physics II


    Algebra- and trigonometry-based general physics course covering principles of wave motion, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics with applications to the health sciences. Second course in a two-semester course sequence. This course is not interchangeable with one-semester physic courses such as PY 200 or PY 205.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 201)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PY 205 - Elements of Physics


    An introduction to some of the elements of classical physics, with emphasis on Newtonian mechanics, energy, momentum, fluids, electricity, magnetism, and geometric optics. Open to students in the doctor of pharmacy program only.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 110, MA 122 or MA 102)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PY 211 - Physics I


    First semester of a three-semester, calculus-based general physics course sequence. It covers principles of mechanics and heat with applications to the health sciences. The course may involve the use of physics web resources, computer-controlled laboratory experiments, and spreadsheets for data analysis. This course meets the PY 201 prerequisite for all physics electives where applicable.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 110, MA 122 or MA 102)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PY 212 - Physics II


    Second semester of a three-semester, calculus-based general physics course sequence. It covers principles of waves, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics with applications to the health sciences. The course may involve the use of physics web resources, computer-controlled laboratory experiments, and spreadsheets for data analysis. This course meets the PY 202 prerequisite for all physics elective courses where applicable.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 211; corequisite: MA 221 or MA 201 or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PY 213 - Physics III


    Third semester of a three-semester, calculus-based general physics course sequence. It is an introduction to the physics of waves, geometrical optics, fluids, and classical thermodynamics. The course may involve the use of physics web resources and computer-controlled laboratory experiments.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 212 and MA 221)

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    PY 301 - Modern Physics I


    Cover atomic nature of matter, electricity and radiation, modules of the atom, X-rays and X-ray spectra, the Schrodinger equation, and wave equation. Includes special theory of relativity.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: MA 221 or MA 201, and PY 202 or PY 212)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 302 - Modern Physics II


    An introduction to physics of the nucleus, models of the nucleus, natural radioactivity, detection, particle acceleration, neutron reactions, activation analysis, and strange particles.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 301)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 305 - Physics Seminar


    Physics topics of current interest are presented orally by students and invited guest speakers. Speech, delivery, use of visual aids, and writing are all evaluated.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 213 and MA 222)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PY 310 - Mechanics


    A study of Newtonian mechanics; particles in one, two, and three dimensions; and systems of particles leading to Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 212)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 315 - Einstein, Bohr, and the Modern Physics Revolution (cross-listed as HI 315)


    An examination of the lives and achievements of the great physicists of the first half of the twentieth century, including Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Wolfgang Pauli, and others, as they developed the basis of special relativity, general relativity, quantum physics, and nuclear physics. Considers the personal and philosophical dilemmas they faced, through an analysis of historical source materials such as letters, papers, and interview transcripts, and delves into the cultural impact of their work.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 200, PY 202, or PY 212, or permission of the instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 320 - Biomedical Instrumentation


    Covers techniques and instruments used in biology, health sciences, and chemistry.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 202)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 324 - Physics of Music


    This course covers the nature of sound, hearing, harmony, and perception of sound. It explains the physics of various musical instruments, human voice, electronic sound systems, electronic music, and acoustical architecture and design of concert halls. Modern advances in the field of music will be discussed.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (There are no prerequisites; however, piano lessons would be useful)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PY 326 - Lasers in Health Sciences


    Teaches the basic principles of operation of a laser, interaction of light with living matter, and safety criteria. The course emphasizes applications of lasers in biology, chemistry, surgery, and many other areas of medicine.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 202, CH 112, and BS 104)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 328 - Light and Color


    Study of the basic concepts of light and color and understanding of optical effects in nature and art.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 330 - Descriptive Astronomy


    Covers basic concepts of astronomy, its historical development, and theories of the origin of the universe. The search for life in the universe, the colonization of outer space, and the social and moral issues of the space program are also covered.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 335 - Views of the Cosmos (cross-listed as HU 335)


    An introduction to the study of the universe from scientific, religious, and philosophical standpoints. Surveys mankind’s efforts to understand the nature of the cosmos, including its origins, evolution, and eventual demise. Viewpoints of many religious groups, cultures, and scientific thinkers will be discussed and compared. Contemporary debates in cosmology will be fully explored without mathematics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: two semesters of MD)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 340 - Biophysics I


    This course focuses on the application of mathematics and physics to the understanding of current problems in cellular and molecular biology. The course covers fundamental and advanced topics involving the study of cells, random walk, diffusion in biological systems, friction in fluids, free energy, self-assembly, protein folding, membranes, nerve impulse, and nanotechnology.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 202 or PY 212, and BS 119 and BS 120 or BS 133 and BS 135 or BS 137, and CH 102 or CH 112, or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 355 - Mathematical Methods for the Physical Sciences (cross-listed as MA 355)


    An introduction to mathematical methods used in physics and the physical sciences such as vector calculus, Fourier analysis, vector spaces and matrices, special functions, and partial differential equations. These topics are introduced in the context of specific problems in various areas of physics and physical science such as fluid dynamics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, biophysics, and mechanics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 212 and MA 221 or MA 202)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 370 - Mathematical Methods for the Physical Sciences I (cross-listed as MA 370)


    This course, the first of the two-course sequence, is an introduction to mathematical methods used in physics, chemistry, and physical and related sciences: vector calculus, functions of complex variable, Fourier series, Fourier transform, series solutions of ordinary differential equations, and introduction to group theory.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: MA 222 and PY 212, or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 371 - Mathematical Methods for the Physical Sciences II (cross-listed as MA 371)


    This course, the second of the two-course sequence, is an introduction to further mathematical methods used in physics, chemistry, physical and related sciences: special functions and partial differential equations. These topics are introduced in the context of specific problems in various areas of physics and physical science such as fluid dynamics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, biophysics, and mechanics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: MA 320 and PY 370/MA 370, or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 380 - Electronics


    Provides the theory of operation and laboratory experiences for both analog and digital circuitry.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 202 or PY 212 or permission of instructor)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 385 - Digital Technology


    This is a hands-on course that explains how digital circuits are designed and applied in systems that execute specific tasks. It also introduces students to some of the most popular applications used in the digital world, such as digital cameras, MP3 players, and iPods.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 200, PY 202, PY 205, or PY 212, or permission of instructor)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 406 - Advanced Lab


    Students will perform modern physics experiments.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 301 or permission of instructor)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PY 410 - Electricity and Magnetism


    A study of the physics of electricity, magnetism, and electromagnetic fields and waves. Emphasis is given to the meaning and significance of the concepts that appear in the theory and the overall coherence and beauty of Maxwell equations.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 212 and MA 222 or MA 202, or permission of instructor)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 411 - Advanced Electromagnetism


    A selection of advanced topics in electromagnetism such as electrostatics, boundary-value problems, fields, and wave propagation in material media. Other topics include propagation in waveguides and transmission lines, gauge transformations, relativistic theory of electromagnetic fields, and numerical techniques in electromagnetism.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: MA 320 and PY 410)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 412 - Physics of Radiation Therapy


    An introduction to the basics of radiation physics, radiation therapy, and dosimetry.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 202 or PY 205 or PY 212)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 415 - Biophysics of the Brain (cross-listed as NS 415)


    This course introduces biophysical models of the brain and the nervous system functioning. In particular the physics of the neocortex is presented through the analysis of EEG studies. Simulations with software packages are employed to illustrate with various examples the models and their results. Linear electrical analogs and some basics of neural network theory are part of the course content. Elements of Biophysics of consciousness are also presented and a set of case studies is analyzed and discussed. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 202 or PY 212)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 420 - Optics and Wave Phenomena


    A study of geometrical and physical optics and a study of waves, interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, dispersion, and polarization of light. The course will also include some aspects of the quantum nature of light, including lasers, and other coherent properties of light.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 310 or permission of instructor)
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 425 - Chaos and Nonlinear Dynamics (cross-listed as MA 425)


    This course introduces the theoretical foundations of nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Phase space analysis, bifurcations, routes to chaos, renormalization and universality, fractals and strange attractors are presented for a variety of nonlinear systems including maps and flows. Several examples are used to illustrate the theory, from mechanical vibrations, superconducting circuits, chemical oscillations to biological rhythms and neuroscience. Simulations are used throughout the course either by numerical computations with Matlab, Mathematica, or specific software packages. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: MA 310 or MA 320)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 430 - Thermodynamics


    This course will provide a detailed study of thermal phenomena, heat engines, thermodynamic laws, and statistical physics. It will discuss applications of thermodynamics and statistical methods and examine low-temperature phenomena such as superconductors.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 212)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 431 - Statistical Mechanics


    An introduction to statistical mechanics and thermal physics of systems involving very many particles. Boltzmann and Gibbs distributions as well as Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics are presented. Various modern applications of the theory are also discussed.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 213, PY 301, PY 310, and PY 450)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 435 - General Relativity


    An introduction to the general theory of relativity. Topics include special relativity, tensor analysis, curved manifolds, the equivalence principle, Einstein’s field equations, spherical static solutions, black holes, and cosmology.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 301 and PY 355)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 440 - Introduction to Nanoscience


    Introduction to broad topics of nanoscience and technology, including micro- and nanofabrication methods, small scale surface modification and characterization, physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials, and quantum phenomena, and their application in natural and engineering sciences. Up-to-date novel experimental and theoretical methods via research-based studies.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite or corequisite: PY 450)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 445 - Introduction to Fluid Dynamics


    Introduction to fluid mechanics, including kinematics and dynamics of fluid transport, and their applications in natural and engineering sciences, particularly in biophysics. Aspects of flow in microfluidic devices, including surfaces and techniques for fluid transport, will be discussed, using up-to-date methods.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites or corequisites: PY 211 and MA 320)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 450 - Quantum Mechanics


    This course will provide a detailed study of quantum phenomena, applied to single particles, multiparticle interactions, and ensembles. Discussions will include the experimental basis of quantum theory, Schroedinger wave equation, particles in various potentials, the hydrogen atom, spin, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics, and other aspects of atomic physics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 212)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 460 - Topics in Contemporary Physics


    A seminar course detailing discoveries in 20th- and 21st-century physics, including nuclear physics, quantum physics, atomic theory, and particle physics. The course covers topics such as radioactivity, fission, fusion, nuclear energy, fundamental particles, wave/particle duality, and modern cosmology. It also addresses the ethical, human, and environmental implications of contemporary physics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 301)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PY 463 - The Physics of Stars and Black Holes


    An introduction to the physics and astrophysics of stellar evolution, including stellar birth, nucleosynthesis, main sequence stars, binary systems, white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 301, PY 310, and PY 371)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 465 - Introduction to Cosmology


    An introduction to the physical properties and evolution of the universe, including its age, content, dynamics, and fate.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 301, PY 310, and PY 371)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 470 - Solid State Physics


    The subject matter of solid state physics supports a profitable interplay of experiment, application, and theory. This course is concerned with the properties that result from the distribution of electrons in metals, semiconductors, and insulators. This course also tells how the elementary excitations and imperfections of real solids can be understood in terms of simple models whose power and utility and now firmly established.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 450)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 480 - Introduction to Materials Science


    General introduction to different types of materials: metals, ceramics, polymers, and composite materials. The relationship between structure and properties of materials are studied, along with the illustration of their fundamental differences and their applications.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: CH 112 and PY 430)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 490 - Special Topics or Research in Physics


    Study of one or two topics not included in other courses offered by the department. This course may be taken more than once for credit, provided the topics covered are sufficiently different or if this course represents a research project.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of the department)

    (Note: Course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 1 to 3

  
  •  

    PY 495 - Undergraduate Research in Physics


    Students will engage in a supervised research project related to physics or biophysics.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 212 or PY 202)

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PY 496 - Advanced Research in Physics


    Students will engage in an advanced research project related to physics or biophysics under the close supervision of a faculty member.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 495)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 498 - Directed Research in Physics


    Students will engage in research of an experimental, computational, or theoretical nature in either physics or biophysics under the close supervision of a faculty member.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: permission of the chair of the Department of Mathematics, Physics, and Statistics)

    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 1 to 3

  
  •  

    PY 700 - Graduate Physics Seminar


    Reports and seminars on topics of current physics interest presented by students. Depending on the instructor, topic may be one of student’s or instructor’s choice. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: Determined by Instructor depending on the topic.) 

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    PY 701 - Medical Physics


    Biomedical applications of physics are covered with emphasis on diagnostic and treatment implications. Problem-solving opportunities and detailed literature review in the areas of physics pertinent to orthopedic and/or neurologic physical therapy practice are included.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisites: PY 201 and PY 202, or PY 211 and PY 212)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 703 - Entrepreneurship and Physics in Industry


    This course provides an overview of the tasks performed by physicists working in the private sector and industry. This includes an introduction of entrepreneurship basics. Students are also involved in projects which may include design, testing, cost feasibility and market analysis of simple products. Professional industrial physicists from the private, public, and government sectors are invited to give presentations and interact with the students. 

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    PY 710 - Advanced Mechanics


    Advanced methods for analyzing classical physical systems, making use of Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and Newtonian techniques. Includes single and multiple particle systems, rigid bodies, symmetry and conservation principles, normal modes of oscillation, continuous systems, and modifications needed for special relativity. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 310) 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 725 - Advanced Nonlinear Dynamics (cross-listed as MA 725)


    The course covers advanced topics in chaos and nonlinear dynamics including center manifolds, homoclinic and heteroclinic tangles and chaotic transport, topology of chaos-branched manifolds, invariant sets, and universality. Also, the symmetry of chaos, chaos in Hamiltonian and conservative systems, KAM theorem, stochastic layers and diffusion, and chaos in quantum systems. Theory will be applied to various systems in physics, chemistry, biology, and other fields. Numerical and computational techniques will be presented and used in the applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY425 or MA425)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 732 - Biophysics


    This course will provide a sound physical basis to biological function. The focus will be at the molecular and cellular levels and will take a detailed look at the energetics and thermodynamics of cellular processes including transport phenomena across cellular membranes. Protein and nucleic acid structure-function relationships will also be studied. Topics in this area include macromolecules in solution, protein-solvent interactions, and electrostatic and electrokinetic phenomena.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: not offered every year)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 750 - Quantum Mechanics


    The course covers the essential theoretical formulation of quantum mechanics and its formal structure. It analyzes kinematics and dynamics of a set of quantum systems in various representations. The course also introduces the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics and quantum mechanics in phase space. Several examples and applications will be used to illustrate the concepts. These include addition of angular momenta, and charged particle in a magnetic field. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 450) 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 771 - Mathematical Methods for the Physical Sciences II


    Advanced mathematical methods to model systems in physics, physical science and engineering. Integral transforms. Series solutions of ordinary differential equations. Special functions. Solution of partial differential equations, with boundary and initial conditions and their applications. Complex variables, complex integration and their applications. Calculus of variations. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 370 or MA 370)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 799 - Graduate Research in Physics


    Candidates for the master of science in physics (thesis option) are required to complete a research project in their chosen track under the direction of a faculty advisor. The student will report the results of this research project in a thesis and will defend the thesis in an oral presentation. A minimum of 10 credits of this course is required for the MS in physics (thesis option); the 10 credits will spread across more than one semester. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Special registration restriction: Approval of the graduate research advisor) 

    (Course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 1-9

  
  •  

    PY 810 - Advanced Electromagnetism


    Advanced methods to study boundary-value in electrostatics. Electrostatics of macroscopic media. Magneostatiscs, Faraday’s Law and quasi-static fields. Maxwell Equations, macroscopic electromagnetism and conservation laws. Electromagnetic waves and wave propagation in different media. The course will cover some applications such as wave guides, resonant cavities, optical fibers, scattering and diffraction. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 410)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 815 - Polymer Physics


    The course analyzes the polymer microstructures and their conformations, single and real chains. It introduces the thermodynamics of blends and solutions as well as networks and gelation. The course also analyzes the dynamics of some polymeric systems. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 431) 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 817 - Quantum Information


    Provides a broad survey of the fundamentals and physical implementation of the rapidly-evolving field of quantum information and computation. It discusses the concept of qubits, quantum entanglement, quantum coherence, and quantum gates and algorithms, with a focus on superconductor-based approaches. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 450)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 830 - Photonics


    Provides a blended survey of the fundamentals and applications of photonics. The course covers the fundamentals of electromagnetic waves and their interaction with matter. The course also includes several applications such as lasers, fiber optics, select optical systems, and advanced materials for photonic and energy-harvesting applications. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 420) 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 831 - Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics


    Foundations of classical statistical mechanics with applications. Phase transitions, critical phenomena, and renormalization group theory. Quantum statistics such as Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions and their applications. Advanced topics in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics such as classical and quantum theory of linear response, Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations and their applications. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 431)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 832 - Network Theory and Its Applications


    Different types of networks are analyzed. These include random and scale-free networks. Their properties and evolution are studied. Examples of how these networks can model real processes and systems are introduced. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 370)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 833 - Pattern Formation


    This course covers different techniques to explore mechanisms of macroscopic pattern formation in a variety of physical systems such as fluids, materials, chemical and biophysical systems. The course introduces both time and space-patterns. The concept of self-organization and formation of coherent structures is discussed in depth. The course also introduces basic techniques for digital pattern recognition. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 425)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 834 - Complexity Theory


    This course introduces the various aspects and approaches within the development of Complexity Theory. These include the probabilistic, algorithmic, computational and axiomatic design approaches. Several examples of complex systems in physical sciences and engineering are introduced to illustrate the theories. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 425)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 840 - Experimental Techniques in Biophysics


    Presentation of the available technologies for the research in biophysics, with emphasis on lab-on-a-chip and its interfaces with the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and mass spectrometry. It covers microfluidics techniques, including channel microfluidics and digital microfluidics. The concept of lab-on-a-chip technology is introduced, showing the possibilities for faster and accurate bio-analytical applications when compared to conventional methods. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 340)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 841 - Physical Approaches to Life Sciences


    The course applies physics and mathematics to obtain quantitative information that sheds light on biological processes, particularly at the cellular and molecular level. It includes microfluidics (with lab-on-chip technologies), random walks, diffusion with drift, statistical mechanics and rate equations, with applications to enzyme kinetics, molecular motors, biological electrcity, and protein folding. Throughout the course, the student is guided in up-to-date discussion on selected papers and presentations on current platforms in the discipline. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 340)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 850 - Experimental Techniques in Materials Science


    Introduces students to the principles and applications of state-of-the-art experimental techniques for the measurement and analysis of the structure and properties of materials. The course will involve a mixture of lectures, demonstrations and hands-on laboratory exercises. Topics are selected from advanced microscopy, electronic, optical, and thermodynamic methods of probing materials. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 480)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 851 - Quantum Materials


    Introduces students to quantum effects in materials. Topics include superconductivity, magnetism, graphene and nanomaterials, topological insulators, charge and spin density waves, classical and quantum phase transitions, and interfaces. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: PY 480)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    PY 890 - Graduate Special Topics in Physics


    This course is designed to allow in-depth exploration of one of a variety of topics of current interest in physics. The topic will be designated by the instructor. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Prerequisite: Determined by Instructor depending on the topic.)

    Credits: 1-3
  
  •  

    RS 301 - Women and Religion


    Women and Religion will investigate issues of gender in Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity. Aspects considered will include the representations of the divine, the role of women in religious institutions, and rules regarding the human body, marriage and sexuality.

     

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    RS 302 - Religious Song and Poetry


    This class will explore poetry, hymns, and visual arts that praise various divine beings and religious figures. Our study will include acts of devotion, the lives of the artists who created them, and their religious and historical contexts.

     

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    RS 303 - Modern Hinduism


    This course explores the ideas, beliefs, and practices of lived Hinduism. We will compare and constrast diverse Hindu cultures that are found in rural and urban India, in the United States, and here on campus. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RS 304 - Gender and Religion


    Gender and Religion will investigate issues of gender in Hinduism, Islam, Christianity. Aspects considered will include the representation of the divine, the role women in religious institutions, and rules regarding the human body, marriage, and sexuality. RS304 Gender and Religion is a Humanities course that satisfies an Ethics skill learning objective of the general education curriculum; it fulfills credit toward the Humanities Major, Humanities Minor, and Creative Writing Minor. 

     

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    RS 310 - World Religions


    This course surveys some of the major religious traditions with an emphasis on comparing their perspectives on truth claims, ultimate reality, and human morality. It explores historical and contemporary perspectives on their basic beliefs and sacred texts. The course also examines the ritual practices and ethical dimensions of each religion.
     

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RS 320 - Religion and Medicine


    An introduction to the historical development of medicine across a variety of religious traditions.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RS 322 - Sacred Stuff


    Sacred Stuff approaches the study of religious experience through the material world, objects, feelings, and sensations. What does religion feel like? How does it taste or smell? We will explore varieties of religion through our senses and study sacred objects crafted by artists inspired by the divine.  

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RS 340 - Special Topics in Religious Studies


    Topics addressed in this course vary.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: course is repeatable for credit)

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RX 302 - Professional Orientation


    This course module provides an introduction to the goals and expectations for student pharmacists entering the professional phase of the PharmD program. Health-related pre-requisites and anatomy/physiology knowledge will be assessed, and the personal and professional development expectations for success will be introduced, including emotional intelligence, team building, professional attire/attitudes/behaviors, relationship building, and professionalism. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: P1 PharmD [student pharmacists])

    Credits: 2
  
  •  

    RX 305 - Foundations of Clinical Immunology


    This module provides a foundation in human immune system components as applied to vaccine design, immunotherapies and biologies. Discussion will emphasize combating infectious disease, cancer, autoimmunity, and allergic responses. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: P1 PharmD [student pharmacists])

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RX 316 - Practice Skills/Professional Behavior 1


    This module introduces the skills necessary for patient engagement and interaction, emphasis is on the role of the pharmacist, Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process, communication (verbal and written), professionalism and ethics. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: P1 PharmD [student pharmacists])

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    RX 325 - Medication Use Systems 1


    This module provides an introduction to the principles and processes involved in medication acquisition/procurement, storage, prescribing/ordering, dispensing, including handling of controlled substances, utilization of medication safety information, documentation, health insurance payments systems and health informatics. The overall goal is for student pharmacist to demonstrate knowledge of these processes and to be able to process a non-complicated prescription for payment in both community and institutional pharmacy environments. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: P1 PharmD [student pharmacists])

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RX 330 - Foundations of Biomedical Sciences


    A foundation in the structure, properties, biological functions, bioenergetics, and metabolic fate of macromolecules essential to life (i.e. proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids), the impact of molecular genetics on these processes; also, application of these concepts to human disease, drug therapy and rational drug design strategies. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: P1 PharmD [student pharmacists])

    Credits: 4
  
  •  

    RX 340 - Foundations of Pharmaceutical Sciences 1


    This module provides an introduction to medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics, compounding and pharmaceutical calculations. Medicinal chemistry focuses on the in vitro and in vivo chemical basis of drug action including their physico-chemical properties, structure activity relationships and receptor binding and metabolism. Pharmaceutics focuses on the principles and applications of dosage forms. Mathematical skills to accurately prepare prescriptions, including extemporaneously compounded dosage forms are included. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: P1 PharmD [student pharmacists])

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RX 345 - Foundations of Pharmaceutical Sciences 2


    This module continues with an understanding of the principles and applications of physico-chemical properties of drugs for safe and effective drug delivery. Pharmacodynamics and basic pharmacokinetics with calculations are emphasized in order to provide a thorough understanding of the mechanisms (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination) involved in therapeutic and adverse drug actions. Selection of appropriate dosage forms that minimize adverse effects/toxicity are covered. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: P1 PharmD [student pharmacists])

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RX 350 - Integrated Pharmacy Sciences, Disease and Therapeutics (iPSDT) 1: Disease Prevention and Self-Care


    This module is the first of the 14 iPSDT modules which integrate the application of the pharmacy sciences, including medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and pharmaceutics specific disease states and therapeutic decision-making. This module focuses on the principles that underline disease pathogenesis and self-care pharmacotherapy. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: P1 PharmD [student pharmacists])

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RX 355 - Integrated Pharmacy Sciences, Disease and Therapeutics (iPSDT) 2: Cardiovascular 1


    The Cardiovascular 1 module is first of two modules focused on the cardiovascular system. It focuses on the application of the pharmacy sciences, including medicinal chemistry, pharmacology and pharmaceutics to cardiovascular diseases and therapeutic decision-making. The module encompasses the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, prevention, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment and self-care of cardiovascular medical conditions. Included are complementary and alternative therapies. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: P1 PharmD [student pharmacists])

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RX 365 - Integrated Pharmacy Sciences, Disease and Therapeutics (iPSDT) 3: Pulmonary


    The Pulmonary module focuses on the application of the pharmacy sciences, including medicinal chemistry, pharmacology and pharmaceutics to pulmonary diseases and therapeutic decision-making. The module encompasses the etiology, pathophysiology, prevention, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment, and self-care of pulmonary medical conditions. Included are complementary and alternative therapies. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: P1 PharmD [student pharmacists])

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    RX 380 - IPPE-1: Service Learning/Community Practice 1


    Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs) provides experiences that enhance and support didactic knowledge and skills. The focus of this course is a preceptor directed experience in service learning and community pharmacy practice. Students will be assigned a service learning and community pharmacy site. Students will observe and be engaged in the following foundational components under preceptor supervision: medication use system, patient and healthcare practitioner communications, patient counseling, self-care triage, and patient care activities. Students will also be involved in professional pharmacy organizations, community service and advocacy. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    (Note: P1 PharmD [student pharmacists])

    Credits: 1
 

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